Category Archives: Museum News & Events

Whistler Museum in the community.

Whistorical Photo Challenge

It’s time to re-imagine some of Whistler’s historical photographs!

Each week we’ll be posting a selection of photos and we want to see how you recreate them (in a safe, physical distance maintaining way).  Up this week, we have:

Two colourful skiers examine their skis on Whistler Mountain in the 1980s. Whistler Mountain Ski Corporation Collection.

Myrtle Philip in her iconic hand-sewn pants in the 1930s. Philip Collection.

Katie McGregor, Jean Tapley, and a gentleman friend pose in their fashionable swimwear of 1925. Philip Collection.

John Hetherington poses with an axe while installing the water system at Tokum Corners in 1973. George Benjamin Collection.

You can share your images on social media by tagging @whistlermuseum on Instagram or Facebook, or email us at events @ whistlermusem.org.

We can’t wait to see your interpretations!

Naming Night (NOT) at the Museum

The Whistler Museum is looking for your help again!  As part of this interactive event, we’re seeking assistance in putting names to faces and places that appear in Whistler’s history.  Whether you’ve been in the valley for decades or are new to the area, have lived here or visited over the years, are staying home in the valley or haven’t been back in an age, we’ll be displaying a collection of photographs that we are searching for more information on.  Help us identify your friends, family, and anything in between!

This Naming Night will be a little different than usual.  Instead of having you all come to the museum, we’ll be bringing the photos to you!  We will be posting an album of photos on our Facebook page (find it here) at 7 pm PDT on Tuesday, April 21.  Names and information can be added to each individual photo in the comment section, or you can even tag your friends in the photograph.  Despite the physical distance, we hope the photos will still generate the discussions and debates about their who, what, where, when and why that we have enjoyed so much at our in-person events.

COVID-19 Update: Whistler Museum Closed

The Whistler Museum has made the difficult decision to close to the public until further notice.  We continue to monitor the situation and follow the advisories of Vancouver Coastal Health and the Province of British Columbia.  We thank everyone for their understanding and hope to see you all back at the museum soon.

We will be keeping up our online and social media presence, and will continue to work on behind-the-scenes and special projects, while observing social distancing and working from home whenever possible.  Take care of yourself and each other.

Brad Nichols, Executive Director

COVID-19 Update: Programming Postponements & Cancellations

In response to recent developments, the Whistler Museum has made the decision to postpone or cancel all upcoming events and programs until further notice.  At this time, the Whistler Museum will remain open for our regular opening hours and is taking extra precautions for the wellbeing of visitors and staff, including increasing the frequency of cleaning and removing all touch tables and props from the exhibits.  We will continue to update you to any changes in our hours.

If you have already purchased your tickets for Highways of the Past: Canoeing the Grand Canyon of the Liard, we will be happy to refund tickets at any time.  We are working with our presenters to reschedule our March events for a later date.

We continue to monitor the situation and follow the advisories by Vancouver Coastal Health and the Province of British Columbia.  We thank everyone for their understanding and hope to see you all back at the Whistler Museum soon.

Brad Nichols, Executive Director

Volunteers of 2010: The Weasel Workers

This past month, the Whistler Museum opened a temporary exhibit on the Sea to Sky volunteers of the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games.  The exhibit will run through March as Whistler continues to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Paralympic Games.  One of the groups included in this exhibit is a group that formed well before the Games ever came to Whistler.

The Weasel Workers formed in the 1970s when Bob Parsons bad his crew of six prepped the course for the first World Cup Downhill races in Whistler.  Most of the early volunteers were parents of Whistler Mountain Ski Club members, but membership grew over the years as Weasels continued to work on the courses for large races on Whistler and began sending volunteers to help build courses for World Cups, World Championships, and Winter Olympics on other mountains.  When the Games were awarded to Whistler and Vancouver in 2003, the Weasel Workers began recruiting and building their team well in advance of the alpine events held on Whistler Mountain.

Weasels on the course with no sign of the sun. Photo: Lance the Ski Patroller

During the 2010 Games, the number of Weasel Workers swelled to about 1,500 volunteers.  Volunteers came from across Canada and other nations to join a core group of 400 to 500 volunteers from Vancouver and the Sea to Sky area.  About 300 volunteers worked specifically for the Paralympics, and a couple hundred Weasel Workers volunteered to work for both the Olympics and Paralympics.  Weasel volunteers began their work for the Vancouver Organizing Committee (VANOC) on Whistler Mountain as early as mid-November 2008 and continued to clean the courses well after the Games had left town.

Even during the Games, the Weasels continued to be a family affair.  Bunny Hume, who began volunteering the with Weasels with her husband Dick in the early 1980s when their grandsons began ski racing, volunteered alongside multiple family members.  She handed out and collected race bibs, her son Rick was the Chief of Course for the women’s course, and her grandsons Jeff and Scott worked on the dye crew.  Rick’s wife Lynne also worked as a Weasel during the Paralympics.

Weasel Workers working on the downhill course for the Olympics. Photo: Lance the Ski Patroller

Some of the Weasel Workers who began volunteering as ski club parents even had children competing in the Games.  Long-time Weasel Andrée Janyk, who could often be found working on a course with a smile, saw two of her children, Britt and Mike, race in the Olympics in their hometown.

Karl Ricker, also a long-time dedicated Weasel Worker, was on the mountain trying to prevent people from crossing where the winch-cats were working when he received the news that Maëlle Ricker, his daughter, had won a gold medal in snowboard-cross on Cypress Mountain and become the first Canadian woman to claim an Olympic gold on home soil.  He went down to Vancouver to attend her medal ceremony, but was back at work on the course early the next morning.

Despite rain, wet snow, and warm weather over the first few days of the Games, and the postponement of three races, the Weasel Workers created and maintained courses for the men’s, women’s, and Paralympic alpine races that were seen around the world in 2010, and those who came to Whistler to work with the Weasels became just as much a part of the team as the long-time volunteers.  Patrick Maloney, then the Weasel president, told The Whistler Question that, “Anybody that’s on that track is a Weasel Worker.”  This sentiment was echoed by Weasel Worker Colin Pitt-Taylor, who claimed that, “as soon as you started working on an alpine course, you became a Weasel Worker, whether you like it or not.”

Revisiting Highways of the Past: Canoeing the Grand Canyon of the Liard

Due to the popularity of the film last year, we’re bringing back Mike Stein and his film Highways of the Past: Canoeing the Grand Canyon of the Liard!

In 1972 Mike Stein and five fellow adventurers (Adolf Teufele, Wink Bradford, Ferdi Wenger, Jim McConkey & Harvey Fraser) set out on a journey on the Liard River through parts of the Yukon, British Columbia and the Northwest Territories.  Their trip focused on the Grand Canyon, a 20 km stretch of the Liard containing numerous class IV and higher rapids, and was filmed by Adolf Teufele.  For decades the resulting 16mm film was thought lost, but Mike not only found a copy but had it digitized.

Since its premiere at the Whistler Museum’s 2019 Speaker Series, the film has been on a journey of its own, and Mike Stein will be on hand to discuss the experiences he has had with Highways of the Past over the last year.

Doors open at 6:30 pm.  Show begins at 7 pm.

Tickets are on sale at the Whistler Museum.  Early bird tickets are $10 ($5 for museum and Club Shred members).  Tickets on March 18 are $12 ($7 for museum and Club Shred members).

Building the Spirit: Whistler’s Volunteers of the 2010 Games

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of the 2010 Olympic Winter Games, the Whistler Museum presents our latest temporary exhibit, featuring stories and artefacts of the volunteers and community members who made the Games a unique experience in Whistler.  Join us opening night to share your own tales of 2010 and show off your Olympic memorabilia (we’re betting a lot of you still have those red mitts and blue coats)!

Doors open at 6:30 pm, Friday, February 28.  Free admission.

Catering (cash bar and complimentary snacks) provided by the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre with the support of the RMOW.

Exhibit closes April 19.