Category Archives: Whistler’s Answers

Whistler’s Answers: November 3, 1983

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1983.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: The Alta Lake Sports Club (ALSC) began building cross-country ski trails in the Whistler valley, specifically around Lost Lake, in the 1970s. The ALSC groomed the trails and, for the first years, they were available for free to anyone with skis. In the early 1980s, when the municipality held a referendum on the development of parks and trails in the valley, it was widely understood that the maintenance would be paid for through taxes. The municipality proposed charging cross-country skiers to access the trails at Lost Lake Park in 1983, causing controversy within Whistler as some residents felt it was one of the only free activities available in the winter, the facilities at Lost Lake Park didn’t warrant a $2 fee, and the ALSC had previously been able to afford to provide the maintenance for free.

Question: Is Council justified in charging cross-country skiers to use Lost Lake Park?

Les Doyle – Unemployed – Brio

I think it’s ridiculous. The trails should be a service to the community. I know a few people who come just to cross-country ski and it’ll turn them off. If it’s a public park you can’t really charge to get in.

Cathy Greenwood – Hotel Office Manager – Whistler Cay

Yes. It’s costing us taxpayers money, not the government. I don’t think people will object to it. Back east they have to pay for cross-country. It’s not like they’re charging $10.

Samuel P. Umpkin – Sci-fi Novelist – Tapley’s Farm

I think it’s a seedy thing to do. I haven’t skied myself since my accident, but I can see that concerns will be voiced that a public park should be a free public park. They may as well charge for… pumpkins, for example.

Whistler’s Answers: October 27, 1983

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1983.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: A public meeting was planned for October 31, 1983 to discuss a proposal by Stoney’s Restaurant to extend the lounge out under the existing covered walkway and to move the walkway over the planters. Stoney’s, which is the current location of La Bocca, wanted to increase the capacity of their lounge from 22 seats to 65 seats by moving their south wall towards the edge of the walkway. Municipal planners were concerned that this act would create a precedent for other village sites. Design guidelines specified that developers must provide covered walkways within their own property and Stoney’s plans would extend the covered walkway onto property owned by Whistler Land Co. Developments.

Question: Should Stoney’s be allowed to expand its lounge?

Kent Thornton – Bartender – Whistler Village

If there’s room I don’t see why not. I don’t think a precedent will affect the other places in the village. If one store wanted to expand, all the other places in that area would have to be moved out as well.

Veena Goodin – Unemployed – Vancouver

Well, my feeling is yes, if there’s a need. Not to let it happen wouldn’t be quite right. Let it happen, and deal with any problems when they arise. You shouldn’t want to stop progress, that’s very important.

Jim Gravel – Hotel Employee – White Gold

It would be okay for Stoney’s, but everyone else will want to do the same. Every case should be dealt with on its own. With Stoney’s not too many people walk through there in the spring as it is.

Whistler’s Answers: October 20, 1983

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1983.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: When construction began on the Whistler Convention Centre, plans included a swimming pool, an ice rink, saunas, racquetball and squash courts, a restaurant and more. By 1983, when it had been taken over by the Crown corporation Whistler Land Co. Developments and redesigned under Chester Johnson, most of the extra facilities had been eliminated. Find out more about the early plans for the building here.

Question: Is the new Whistler Convention Centre design adequate?

Doug Greenwood – Hotel Manager – Whistler Cay

From the beginning the centre was designed wrong. It should be just a convention centre. It would be nice to have an ice rink, but that wouldn’t stimulate jobs. I don’t understand why it can’t be ready sooner (before April ’85). There’s men available and 24 hours in a day.

Ron McCready – Restaurant Manager – Whistler

I think it’s great. The vast majority of people at the meeting were pleased. My only disappointment is that the convention centre won’t be open in time for next winter. The design is great, it’s exactly what’s needed.

Laurie Vance – Hotel Employee – Alpine Meadows

I think it’s wonderful I’m sorry they’re not putting in a swimming pool, that would have been nice. But it wouldn’t help Whistler if everyone complained about it. The time frame is as fast as they can do it.

Whistler’s Answers: October 13, 1983

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1983.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: On October 6, 1983, Dave Barrett, NDP MLA for Vancouver East and former Premier of BC from 1972 to 1975, was forcibly removed from the Legislative Assembly chamber by the Sergeant-At-Arms staff after repeatedly disregarding the authority of the Speaker during a debate on the Social Credit government’s Public Sector Restraint Act, 1983. The bill proposed major cutbacks in social services, education, and labour and had led to demonstrations and work stoppages throughout the summer and fall. Barret, who had announced his resignation as leader of the NDP in May 1983 but agreed to stay on until the end of the year, was serving as Opposition Leader. This was the first time that an MLA had to be forcibly removed from BC’s Legislative Assembly. The bill received Royal Assent on October 12, 1983.

Question: What do you think of recent activities in the legislature?

Marilyn Willoughby – Mom – Alpine Meadows

To be quite honest, I don’t pay much attention. People love to complain. It seems that whoever gets in, there’s the same problem.

Mike Litwyn – Developer – Victoria

It’s politics. Two parties fighting for space in the newspapers. I wasn’t suprised to see what happened (Barrett’s ejection from the house). BC has been that way for years. I think the legislation will get through, but watered down a little.

Jim Tabrett – Log Builder – Emerald Estates

I think it’s typical of Bennett’s whole attitude toward his mandate to rule by any means he sees fit. They’ve opened the door to a lot of political ballyhooing. These people are supposed to be our guides.