Tag Archives: Crafts in the Park

The End of Crafts in the Park for 2017

Today marked the end of “Crafts in the Park” for the summer of 2017. Every Friday for the last seven weeks, the Whistler museum got together with the Whistler Public Library to host a fun story time and craft activity. This was the fourth year running the event, which will be sure to continue in summers to come.

citp5wtm.jpg

The Whistler Museum and Public Library team up in Florence Petersen Park for fun Friday crafts.

Each year has a new theme, and this year’s theme was, “A Journey Through Whistler’s History”. Our crafts travelled from hundreds of years ago with the First Nations, all the way to the 2010 Winter Olympic Games, with crafts to match each point in history. The first week was extra fun, as we joined up with the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre, to make traditional First Nation’s dreamcatchers. For week 3 we built our very own Rainbow Lodges, just like Myrtle and Alex Philip back in 1914. Although, ours were built from rainbow coloured popsicle sticks, and weren’t big enough to live in.

Rainbow Lodge Craft (2) wtm.jpg

This girl made the roof of her lodge extra special. We never ceased to be proud of how each child’s unique craft turned out.

Week 5 was “Fun with Fishing”, which had to be held inside due to the dense smoke in Whistler. However, the craft was still one of the favourites as the magnetic rods actually stuck to the metal mouths of the fish! Some of the other favourites included, “Beaver Builders”, “Giddy Up Horsey”, and “Travel by Train”.

Beaver Craft (2)wtm.jpg

This little girl come almost every Friday, and loved how the cute little beaver could actually fit into his beaver dam.

Horse Craft wtm.jpg

Three kids proudly showed off their horse crafts. They could stand on their own!

Each hour began with a couple interactive stories read by Julie Burrows from the Whistler Public Library. This was followed by a short history related to the theme, and an explanation of the craft by Sierra from the Whistler Museum. The kids would then get to try out the craft for themselves.

Besides week 5, we were lucky to have nice weather almost every Friday. We usually had about 21 kids, and they all seemed to enjoy both the outdoors and fun activity. Sometimes the kids would add their own touches to the crafts and make them even better and more exciting than we planned for. We even had some kids who showed up every week, always excited for another craft.

CITP1 wtm.jpg

Parents were always keen to help their child out, sometimes doing much of the craft themselves. (Many of them seemed to enjoy it more than they might admit).

See you in 2018 for another summer of Crafts in the Park!

 

Advertisements

Wrapping up Crafts in the Park

Last Friday the Museum wrapped up it’s Crafts in the Park event that it teams up with the Whistler Library for. The event has been running for three years now. Every year we are given a different theme to base all the crafts off of and this year’s was “How do you connect to Whistler”.

This year we ran it for a total of seven weeks and included a different craft every week. Week one had the kids making foam bear masks because nature and especially the bears are very important to Whistler. Week two was a special week because the Museum teamed up with the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre to talk about the importance of the Indigenous history of the area as well as make cedar rope bracelets. Week three was a cardboard tube train engine because one of the first ways to efficiently get into Whistler was by railway. Week four we talked about the Olympics because they were so important for the development of Whistler into what it is today, so the kids made clothespin skiers. The following weeks the kids made screen printed t-shirts from scratch, a pipe cleaner mountain bike and bridge as well as a mini version of the Peak to Peak.

mtn.jpg

Some of the mountain crafts made in the last week of Crafts in the Park.

The Museum had a lot of success with each week and kids really enjoyed themselves each time. Kids were able to be really creative and we saw a lot of great crafts from the kids every week. Each week varied in attendance but on average we had between 20 and 30 children show up each week and had a lot of fun meeting and hanging out with everyone.

kiddies

Two of our Crafts in the Park participants showing off their creations.

Each week our summer student Michaela would start off the event with a bit of history as to why each craft was chosen and how they related to Whistler and then Kristina from the Library would read a book to the kids after which everyone would participate in the craft together. Sometimes our helpers would even participate along with the children so everyone involved had lots of fun. We even had a couple of kids who consistently came every single week!

 

mc.jpg

Michaela showing off a clothespin skier craft

shay

Helper Shayna showing off her mountains!

This event was a lot of fun for everyone involved, the people who made it possible by helping out, the parents of the kids who came, and of course the kids themselves. The Museum loves putting this event on every year and we cannot wait to do this again and again because we have received a lot of praise from parents grateful to have something artistic for their children to participate in and making something that brings kids and the community together. The children loved getting to make different things with their friends and the help of their family.

Crafts in the Park Returns

Tomorrow, July 8th marks the beginning of the Whistler Museum’s Crafts in the Park event series. This year the theme is “How do you connect to Whistler?” and each week we will cover a different aspect of what brings us to Whistler. This could be nature, history, activities and even transport. Each week we will begin with a story and information activity under the story tree and then create a craft together.

This year we will run seven of these in total, and each session will highlight a different aspect of what connects us to Whistler. They begin at 11am and go until noon. It is a drop-in program open for children ages 4-12 with a caregiver present. Crafts in the Park will be held in Florence Peterson Park, which is behind the Museum and Library.

static1.squarespace

Schedule:

July 8 – This week will be oriented around nature, specifically the bears that are so popular in the area. The craft will be a foam bear mask, and the kids will have a choice to make either a black bear or a grizzly bear.

teddy.jpg

Myrtle Philip and Teddy the bear.

July 15 – This week will be a collaboration between the Museum and The Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre so that the kids can learn a bit more of the First Nations history and the pioneers. The craft is being provided by the Cultural Centre and is a cedar rope bracelet.

July 22 – This week focuses on transportation in the early days of Whistler. One of the first methods that made visiting the area easier was the Pacific North-West railway, so this week’s craft will be a cardboard tube train engine.

July 29 – To celebrate Whistler’s history as a ski town and its hosting of the 2010 winter Olympics, week four’s craft is a clothespin skier.

August 5 – Since there are so many activities to do in Whistler and each person enjoys different ones for various reasons the fifth week of crafts will be a screen-printed t-shirt that each child can design and themselves.

August 12 – While Whistler is known for its winter sports, in the summer mountain biking takes over the town. This week the children will get to make a pipe-cleaner bike and a mountain pass made of cardboard.

gritfith.jpg

Greg Griffith Photo.

August 19 – For our final week of crafts the kids will be making a mini replica of the Peak2Peak. To symbolize the coming together of Whistler and Blackcomb mountains that helped Whistler become what it is today.

 

2015 in Review

With the turning of the calendars, like many, we find ourselves reflecting on the year just passed. In many ways 2015 was the museum’s most successful year yet, and we have much to be thankful for.

We had another strong year for our events and programming. In addition to established favourites like our Valley of Dreams walking tours (June through August), Speaker Series events, multiple children’s crafts events, our annual LEGO competitions, and a bunch of school field trip visits, we launched a new program, Discover Nature.

A tiny Western Toad, as seen during the annual migration. Visitors learned all about these toads and other natural wonders at our Discover Nature booth at Lost Lake.

A tiny Western Toad, as seen during the annual migration. Visitors learned all about these toads and other natural wonders at our Discover Nature booth at Lost Lake.

Conceived in partnership with the Whistler Naturalists and the Whistler Biodiversity Project, Discover Nature featured a manned booth in Lost Lake Park all summer, with interactive natural history displays and scheduled interpretive nature walks. We also produced a 15-page accompanying children’s activity book to encourage further learning about our awesome natural surroundings. We look forward to the return of Discover Nature in the summer of 2016.

In terms of general admission, 2015 was our busiest year ever. Furthermore, we managed to squeak by the huge milestone of 10,000 total visitors, not including special events, a few minutes after noon on December 31st! This no doubt has much to do with changing our admissions from a set fee to by donation, as we increased our visitorship by over 50% from last year, but overall admissions revenues experienced a big leap as well.

Having limited physical space for our exhibits, we have to rely heavily on our web presence and social media to help share our stories. We experienced a banner year online as well.

Our Whistorical blog had its busiest year ever coming in just shy of 30,000 views, finishing strong with our two busiest months ever in November and December. Within a week or two we should surpass 100,000 all-time views since we began blogging in May 2011.

The original Red Chair, ca 1970s. Our most popular new blog post of 2015 was a detailed history of all Whistler's ski lifts.

The original Red Chair, ca 1970s. Our most popular new blog post of 2015 was a detailed history of all Whistler’s ski lifts.

Facebook activity has also been at an all-time high, and we managed to attract our 1,000th follower on Christmas Day. Twitter and Instagram continue to be popular and helpful tools for us to share stories, images, news, and events.

And lastly, in September we launched a new online photo gallery and e-commerce website hosted through Smugmug (whistlermuseum.smugmug.com). So far it has been more successful than we even hoped, with more than 450,000 image views in its first four months alone!

Our most popular photo, a classic image of Franz Wilhelmsen and an unidentified friend enjoying a gorgeous spring day in the Whistler alpine, received over 2000 individual views:

ARCHIVE WMA_P89_0001B_WMSC

Looking forward to 2016 we plan on using all these media to keep pumping out stories, but we’re also excited to announce some new projects.

First off, we will be launching a new feature in partnership with Mountain FM called Whistler Heritage Minutes. We will be producing a series of short audio clips telling cool stories, facts and other interesting anecdotes about Whistler’s past, to be aired weekly.

And for those who want even more history content in audio form we will be launching our own in-house podcast this month as well. We’ve got an amazing and ever-growing library of audio recordings from oral histories interviews, Speaker Series events and more that we can draw from, and we can’t wait to get them out there to be heard.

A big thank you to everyone who visited our exhibits, attended our events, read our stories, and otherwise helped spread the word about Whistler’s fascinating heritage. We look forward to seeing you in the new year, and to all the new stories that will be shared.

Kids Summer Fun in Whistler

Summer in Whistler brings out the youngins, as most of them are out of school and looking for interesting and exciting ways to spend their time. Thankfully, there seems to be endless activities for kids all summer long in Whistler.

The Whistler Museum has been joining in on the fun, hosting crafts at Whistler Children’s Festival and starting our own pilot program, Crafts in the Park: Whistler Through the Decades. Crafts in the Park is held every Tuesday in July and August, in Florence Petersen Park. This unique program blends a bit of history with stories and crafts. Each week our theme focuses on a new decade in Whistler’s history. The crafts and stories are best suited for ages 3-12, and children must be accompanied by an adult.

This week for Crafts in the Park, we’re focusing on the 1930s and 1940s, so we’ll be getting back to our photographic roots and hand-painting images from those decades. We love this craft because, well, kids love it, and because it incorporates a whole lot of history!

Before colour film, colour was sometimes applied to monochrome (often referred to as black and white) images by hand-painting. Hand-coloured photographs were most popular from the nineteenth to mid-twentieth century, and the Whistler Museum is lucky to hold some great examples of the process in our collection. To learn more about the process and to see some of those examples, check out our blog post Pioneers in Colour.

Not only does this craft entail a somewhat lost art of early photography, it also gives kids a chance to work with historical images of Whistler. We’ll have a variety of subject matter to choose from, broadening the appeal to just about everyone. Hope to see you there!