Tag Archives: crafts

Kids Après 2017

Kids Après at the museum is back for Family Day this year!  Come by February 11 – 13 and 17 – 20 from 3 – 6pm for colouring, button-making, LEGO, hot chocolate and, of course, exploring our exhibits.

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Entry to the museum is by donation.  Children must be accompanied by an adult.

We’ll be holdings Kids Après again every day during March Break (March 20 – 31), just in case you can’t make it out this month.

Crafts in the Park Returns

Tomorrow, July 8th marks the beginning of the Whistler Museum’s Crafts in the Park event series. This year the theme is “How do you connect to Whistler?” and each week we will cover a different aspect of what brings us to Whistler. This could be nature, history, activities and even transport. Each week we will begin with a story and information activity under the story tree and then create a craft together.

This year we will run seven of these in total, and each session will highlight a different aspect of what connects us to Whistler. They begin at 11am and go until noon. It is a drop-in program open for children ages 4-12 with a caregiver present. Crafts in the Park will be held in Florence Peterson Park, which is behind the Museum and Library.

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Schedule:

July 8 – This week will be oriented around nature, specifically the bears that are so popular in the area. The craft will be a foam bear mask, and the kids will have a choice to make either a black bear or a grizzly bear.

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Myrtle Philip and Teddy the bear.

July 15 – This week will be a collaboration between the Museum and The Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre so that the kids can learn a bit more of the First Nations history and the pioneers. The craft is being provided by the Cultural Centre and is a cedar rope bracelet.

July 22 – This week focuses on transportation in the early days of Whistler. One of the first methods that made visiting the area easier was the Pacific North-West railway, so this week’s craft will be a cardboard tube train engine.

July 29 – To celebrate Whistler’s history as a ski town and its hosting of the 2010 winter Olympics, week four’s craft is a clothespin skier.

August 5 – Since there are so many activities to do in Whistler and each person enjoys different ones for various reasons the fifth week of crafts will be a screen-printed t-shirt that each child can design and themselves.

August 12 – While Whistler is known for its winter sports, in the summer mountain biking takes over the town. This week the children will get to make a pipe-cleaner bike and a mountain pass made of cardboard.

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Greg Griffith Photo.

August 19 – For our final week of crafts the kids will be making a mini replica of the Peak2Peak. To symbolize the coming together of Whistler and Blackcomb mountains that helped Whistler become what it is today.

 

Kids Après

Our popular Kids Après is back for Family Day Weekend, February 7th to 9th from 3-6pm. This is a great chance to bring your youngsters by the museum to experience a bit of culture, colouring, button-making, LEGO, and more. Entry is always by donation. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

We’ll also be holding Kids Après everyday during March Break this year. Hope to see you and the kiddies joining in on the fun!

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Kids Summer Fun in Whistler

Summer in Whistler brings out the youngins, as most of them are out of school and looking for interesting and exciting ways to spend their time. Thankfully, there seems to be endless activities for kids all summer long in Whistler.

The Whistler Museum has been joining in on the fun, hosting crafts at Whistler Children’s Festival and starting our own pilot program, Crafts in the Park: Whistler Through the Decades. Crafts in the Park is held every Tuesday in July and August, in Florence Petersen Park. This unique program blends a bit of history with stories and crafts. Each week our theme focuses on a new decade in Whistler’s history. The crafts and stories are best suited for ages 3-12, and children must be accompanied by an adult.

This week for Crafts in the Park, we’re focusing on the 1930s and 1940s, so we’ll be getting back to our photographic roots and hand-painting images from those decades. We love this craft because, well, kids love it, and because it incorporates a whole lot of history!

Before colour film, colour was sometimes applied to monochrome (often referred to as black and white) images by hand-painting. Hand-coloured photographs were most popular from the nineteenth to mid-twentieth century, and the Whistler Museum is lucky to hold some great examples of the process in our collection. To learn more about the process and to see some of those examples, check out our blog post Pioneers in Colour.

Not only does this craft entail a somewhat lost art of early photography, it also gives kids a chance to work with historical images of Whistler. We’ll have a variety of subject matter to choose from, broadening the appeal to just about everyone. Hope to see you there!

We Heart Kids

The Whistler Museum loves kids. Our exhibits feature tons of hands-on fun, from interactive natural history displays–where kids can compare real animal skulls, mineral specimens and more–to our official 2010 Olympic torch and uniforms that you’re encouraged to try out (take that you stodgy, old “look but don’t touch” museums). You should see the energy levels (or chaos, some would say) in this place when school groups come in.

As part of our efforts to provide as much kid-specific programming as possible, Every Saturday in July we have been opening up the Museum for family-friendly craft activities.

The fun started off with pioneer potato stamping. Inevitably, the kids’ creative designs ended up on more than just the paper we provided. This might have been Whistler’s first locavore craft activity, as all the spuds were Pemberton-sourced.

This past Saturday we welcomed talented artist, long-time Museum friend, and all-around awesome Whistler local Isobel MacLaurin as she offered a painting class for local and visiting youth. Using watercolours, the kids were taught in Izzy’s trademark landscape and wildlife techniques, creating beautiful mountain vistas and noble bald eagles.

Class was in session. When Izzy's running the show, ears perk up.

The kids were really receptive to Izzy’s instruction, and it showed in their work. The day ended with everyone feeling confident that the future of Whistler’s arts community was in good hands.

Coming up next… This Saturday the museum welcomes local bear researcher Michael Allen to give an illuminating talk on our furry friends. There will be face painting to help kids get in character, and we will be making bearpaw-print t-shirts that the kids can take home. T-shirts provided, just bring your young ones!

We round off our Family Saturdays on July 30th with a nature walk led by the Whistler Naturalists, where kids can collect the raw materials to inspire and compose their ecological artwork.

Finally, we’re currently gearing up for our annual LEGO-building contest, which we”ll be hosting August 20th. Believe it or not, the event is now in its 15th year! Stay tuned for more details and registration in the coming weeks!

Everyone loves LEGO! (from last year's competition).