Tag Archives: Florence Peterson Park

The End of Crafts in the Park for 2017

Today marked the end of “Crafts in the Park” for the summer of 2017. Every Friday for the last seven weeks, the Whistler museum got together with the Whistler Public Library to host a fun story time and craft activity. This was the fourth year running the event, which will be sure to continue in summers to come.

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The Whistler Museum and Public Library team up in Florence Petersen Park for fun Friday crafts.

Each year has a new theme, and this year’s theme was, “A Journey Through Whistler’s History”. Our crafts travelled from hundreds of years ago with the First Nations, all the way to the 2010 Winter Olympic Games, with crafts to match each point in history. The first week was extra fun, as we joined up with the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre, to make traditional First Nation’s dreamcatchers. For week 3 we built our very own Rainbow Lodges, just like Myrtle and Alex Philip back in 1914. Although, ours were built from rainbow coloured popsicle sticks, and weren’t big enough to live in.

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This girl made the roof of her lodge extra special. We never ceased to be proud of how each child’s unique craft turned out.

Week 5 was “Fun with Fishing”, which had to be held inside due to the dense smoke in Whistler. However, the craft was still one of the favourites as the magnetic rods actually stuck to the metal mouths of the fish! Some of the other favourites included, “Beaver Builders”, “Giddy Up Horsey”, and “Travel by Train”.

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This little girl come almost every Friday, and loved how the cute little beaver could actually fit into his beaver dam.

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Three kids proudly showed off their horse crafts. They could stand on their own!

Each hour began with a couple interactive stories read by Julie Burrows from the Whistler Public Library. This was followed by a short history related to the theme, and an explanation of the craft by Sierra from the Whistler Museum. The kids would then get to try out the craft for themselves.

Besides week 5, we were lucky to have nice weather almost every Friday. We usually had about 21 kids, and they all seemed to enjoy both the outdoors and fun activity. Sometimes the kids would add their own touches to the crafts and make them even better and more exciting than we planned for. We even had some kids who showed up every week, always excited for another craft.

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Parents were always keen to help their child out, sometimes doing much of the craft themselves. (Many of them seemed to enjoy it more than they might admit).

See you in 2018 for another summer of Crafts in the Park!

 

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Crafts in the Park Returns

Tomorrow, July 8th marks the beginning of the Whistler Museum’s Crafts in the Park event series. This year the theme is “How do you connect to Whistler?” and each week we will cover a different aspect of what brings us to Whistler. This could be nature, history, activities and even transport. Each week we will begin with a story and information activity under the story tree and then create a craft together.

This year we will run seven of these in total, and each session will highlight a different aspect of what connects us to Whistler. They begin at 11am and go until noon. It is a drop-in program open for children ages 4-12 with a caregiver present. Crafts in the Park will be held in Florence Peterson Park, which is behind the Museum and Library.

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Schedule:

July 8 – This week will be oriented around nature, specifically the bears that are so popular in the area. The craft will be a foam bear mask, and the kids will have a choice to make either a black bear or a grizzly bear.

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Myrtle Philip and Teddy the bear.

July 15 – This week will be a collaboration between the Museum and The Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre so that the kids can learn a bit more of the First Nations history and the pioneers. The craft is being provided by the Cultural Centre and is a cedar rope bracelet.

July 22 – This week focuses on transportation in the early days of Whistler. One of the first methods that made visiting the area easier was the Pacific North-West railway, so this week’s craft will be a cardboard tube train engine.

July 29 – To celebrate Whistler’s history as a ski town and its hosting of the 2010 winter Olympics, week four’s craft is a clothespin skier.

August 5 – Since there are so many activities to do in Whistler and each person enjoys different ones for various reasons the fifth week of crafts will be a screen-printed t-shirt that each child can design and themselves.

August 12 – While Whistler is known for its winter sports, in the summer mountain biking takes over the town. This week the children will get to make a pipe-cleaner bike and a mountain pass made of cardboard.

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Greg Griffith Photo.

August 19 – For our final week of crafts the kids will be making a mini replica of the Peak2Peak. To symbolize the coming together of Whistler and Blackcomb mountains that helped Whistler become what it is today.