Tag Archives: Halloween

This Week In Photos: November 1

If you’re looking for photos of Halloweens past, look no further than the Whistler Question Collection!

1978

This large pile of building material debris collecting under the power line at Function Junction.

Package #7 – The new Post Office site is identified at the Town Centre with the school in the background.

The western pine log home nearing completion in Alpine Meadows – construction by Canadiana Homes Corp.

1980

Whistler Daycare Hallowe’en Party!

Jack Davey (far right) talks to one of his first customers in his new hardware store in the Town Centre. Only open a week, the store boasts a huge inventory of dry goods from kitchen ware to backyard tools.

Blue Northern belted out the dancin’ tunes to the delight of the 250+ customers that attended the Country Hoedown and Trucker’s Ball in the Blackcomb Maintenance garage. It was the third annual for the Cookhouse Organization.

Member of the fitness awareness squad that visited the school over the weekend chats with Joan Gross as she pedals the specially adapted exercise bike that measures how the body’s cardiovascular system is working.

The Town Centre as it is this last week of October from the north looking south. Parking is now available on the large football field-looking structure to the right. The structures at the bottom left are the employee trailers, the circle in the middle is for dropping passengers at Blackcomb Lodge and Phase Two projects are shown in various states of construction in the middle left.

1981

Auctioneer Paul Burrows offers the giant collage by Chris Speedie for sale at the Ski Team Benefit. The picture fetched a tidy $1,100.

Discussing the benefits of the benefit (l to r): Dennis Waddingham, Steve Podborski, Dave Murray, Toulouse and Deedee Haight of the Alpine Ski Team.

There were bewildering moments for many Whistler residents upon awakening Saturday, October 31 to the sounds of raging creeks. This resident of Panorama Drive in Brio says it all with a shrug – after all, what can you say when there’s a river where there once was none?

Norm Dedeluk (centre) gets more than a helping hand from two fellow volunteer firemen in dislodging debris from raging Brio Creek.

Half of the Myrtle Philip Kindergarten Class – from the left: Kris Jones, Kelly Hamilton, Michael Hoffmann, Simon Beller, Christopher Systad, Aaron Gross, Alexander Fordham and Karen Kogler.

Principal Bob Daly is surrounded by teachers Sue Christopher (left) and Sandra Pauliuk-Epplett all dressed in their Halloween finery.

1982

Smokey Batzer demonstrates artificial resuscitation techniques to employees of the Delta Mountain Inn.

And the winner is… Steve Podborski draws the lucky number of the grand prize winner at the Canadian National Ski Team Benefit as Dennis Waddingham looks on. The benefit was held October 29 at L’Apres.

His Honour Dave Murray passes royal judgement on the winning costume at Araxi’s first birthday party Sunday, October 31. Lucky Andre walked away with $100 for his light and airy costume, which just may give the mountains some bright ideas for transporting skiers.

Halloween brought all kinds in all sorts of outfits into Whistler Village October 30 and 31. Revellers whooped it up at Nasty Jack’s Halloween Party and Bullets Cabaret.

What better way to end an evening of trick or treating than being treated to Whistler’s third annual Halloween fireworks display, put on by the Whistler Volunteer Fire Department.

Provincial crews began taking apart the Bailey bridge which spans the River of Golden Dreams at Highway 99. Work on the dismantling job began November 1.

1983

Members of the Canadian Olympic Soccer Team gathered in Myrtle Philip playing field Tuesday after training on top of Whistler Mountain Monday. Twenty-one players and coaching staff head to Mexico City Saturday to battle against the Mexican national team which they defeated 1-0 in Victoria. The Canadian team must draw or win against Mexico to advance to the next round in the Olympic qualifying matches. Good luck lads!

Gruesome monster Davey Blaylock tricked and treated with timid lion Jake Humphrey and hideous Swamp Thing Aaron Gross. Students of Myrtle Philip School paraded before parents in the gym before going off to Halloween parties in their classrooms.

One of the, ah, more penetrating costumes worn by a reveller in the Mountain House.

It was a Monday full of goblins, ghouls and costumes as Whistlerites celebrated Halloween around the village. Kids and parents watch fireworks in front of the Tri-Services Building put on by the Volunteer Fire Department. Coffee and a huge log fire kept everyone warm as they oohed and aahed the well-organized fireworks display.

The first crests and embroidered garments will soon be rolling off a computerized embroidery machine at Function Junction. Owners Jan Holmberg and Ted Nebbeling paid $80,000 for the Japanese-made machine that has twelve sewing heads.

1984

Antonio Pellin from Custom Paving takes a 16 tonne compacting machine to Highway 99 at Village Gate Boulevard in preparation for the final paving and installation of a traffic light at the intersection. Once the work is completed this month, Whistler will have its first traffic light and the intersection will have an extra lane for turning into the village from both north and south.

About 12 cm of powdery snow covered the valley Tuesday in the first major snowfall of the season. A group of local women decided to herald the unofficial beginning of winter by building a ‘snow-woman’ in Village Square Tuesday. The ‘snow-woman’ featured brussel sprouts for a mouth, potatoes for eyes and a carrot for the nose.

Youngsters at Myrtle Philip School had their first frolic in the snow Tuesday morning, arriving at the school to fine their friends as well as about 12 cm of fresh new powder.

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Spooktacular Crafts at the Whistler Museum

This Halloween weekend, join us at the Museum October 29 & 30 for some creepy crafts and a special Halloween tour of our haunted museum.

halloween-crafts

On Saturday, make your own Paper Bag Monsters to take home and use as decorations or puppets.  On Sunday we’ll be creating Paper Plate Spiders.  These spooky Halloween creatures can be displayed hanging in windows or on walls to frighten your guests or passers-by.

Costumes are encouraged and early Halloween treats will be provided. Admission is by donation and children must be accompanied by an adult. Thanks to Arts Whistler, Brendan Cavanagh and the Whistler Haunted House team for the Museum’s spooky transformation.

Halloween Inspiration from Whistler’s Past

So, if you were somehow unaware, tomorrow is Halloween. If you didn’t know that, then chances are you don’t have your costume sorted yet. Fret not! The Whistler Museum is here to help.

Just because you’re thinking up your costume last minute doesn’t mean you need to resort to some cliché pop culture reference like Game of Thrones or Matt Damon from the Martian. Whistler’s past is full of great ideas for timeless costumes to impress your friends. As a bonus, your costume can spark intriguing discussions about Whistler’s history at your Halloween party, something we fully endorse.

It’s no secret that Whistlerites love to party, especially when dressing up is involved. Let’s examine some examples of party dress from Whistler’s past.

First off we have the Freaker’s Ball, a party of legendary proportions that occurred in the 1970s in the Christiania Inn, in Alta Vista. Based on a rather freaky song by Dr. Hook, people liked to dress, well, freaky. This could mean anything, basically, which isn’t a bad place to start when trying to come up with up with unique costume ideas.

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Mozart, anyone? He was like the classical Taylor Swift.

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Is this guy having a good time, or what? Buccaneer baby!

Not into the whole hippie thing? OK, let’s go further back in time for some pioneer-era inspiration.

Unfortunately, this next photo from our archives doesn’t have any real explanation. One could even assume that it’s not a costume, but historically appropriate farming attire from the period. We’re not going to dwell on this for too long. It’s a sweet costume idea.

It's Halloween every day in Whistler! (When I first saw this I thought it was a KKK thing, but I think maybe this person is dressed as a wizard).

Know a member of the opposite sex? Well you can always borrow their clothes and dress in drag! These guests at Hillcrest Lodge donned some feminine attire to great effect, freaking out passersby on the PGE railway.

Hillcrest Lodge guests dressed to meet the train

We'll never forget the year Dad put on a one man show of Swan Lake.

Admittedly, cross-dressing is a more interesting costume idea for men, generally. It’s hard for a woman in men’s clothing to look this stunning. I’m sure some creative ladies out there could pull it off though!

Of course, Myrtle and Alex Philip, Whistler’s founding couple, had a distinct sense of style. A quick check through your wardrobe, your tickle-trunk, or trip to the Re-Use-It centre might be enough to pull one of these off. Bonus points for couples who pull of the historic pair.

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Myrtle Philip in riding garb. She designed and tailored most of her outfits herself.

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The all-white safari ensemble was an Alex Philip staple. This elegant get-up is sure to impress the ladies.

A little Myrtle & Alex dress-up inspiration. Photo: Joern Rohde/wpnn.org

A little Myrtle & Alex dress-up inspiration.
Photo: Joern Rohde/wpnn.org

To be fair, these costumes rely on some pretty unique clothing items that you may not have lying around the house. Fair, I guess. Have a bunch of cardboard and some metallic spray paint? Well you can go as the original Creekside Gondola!

You can be the hottest aluminum box at the party!

One bonus with this costume is that the original gondola had a four-person capacity, so you can host your own mini party within the party!

If an inanimate metal structure isn’t your thing, that’s cool. How about a marmot? These fuzzy little creatures are the reason Whistler Mountain got it’s name.

Not feeling energetic? Wear all brown and chill out on a couch. Just like a marmot.

All it takes is some furry brown clothing, buck teeth, and an ability to whistle. You might be dressed as a marmot already, and not even realize it! With the proliferation of animal onesies, this should be easy.

Why stop there. There are plenty of other icons from Whistler’s past that could become killer costumes with a little creativity: Willy Whistler, the Roundhouse Lodge, Black Tusk… BLACK TUSK!!!