Tag Archives: Highland Lodge

This Week In Photos: November 29

1979

One of the many new international symbol signs at Garibaldi Lifts.

Mr. Bob Ainsworth, the new general manager of Garibaldi Lifts Ltd., Whistler operation.

The pillared form of package no. 2 rises at the Town Centre looking like a southern mansion.

A study in concentration – Trev Roote carves out house number signs at the Fall Fair.

The new first aid room in the old garage building at the lift base.

New signs for winter parking regulations were revealed this week.

One of Whistler Disposal’s new front-loading garbage compactor trucks at work at the Mons site.

1980

Evelyn and Harold Cullen cut their 40th anniversary cake.

The products of the Mountain Cake Bake – part of the annual Fall Fair.

The snow arrives – an early scene in Alpine Meadows.

Mayor Pat Carleton shows off Town Centre to Jim Lorimer, Charles Barter and Bob Williams.

1981

The proposed course for the 1982 World Cup was discussed at the latest meeting.

Pottery of all kinds was for sale at the Fall Fair over the last weekend.

Eager skiers head up for the fresh snow on Blackcomb…

… while skis pile up at the base.

The latest winter fashions were on show in the Myrtle Philip School gym.

1982

A dozen of the finest roses is presented to Kay Carleton, the woman behind the man during Pat Carleton’s seven-year term as Whistler’s mayor. One of the municipality’s first aldermen, Garry Watson, presented the gift to Mrs. Carleton during a surprise party held at the Delta Mountain Inn November 29 for the retiring mayor.

Ahoy there mate! November 27 was moving day for the sailboat being built by Cress Walker and Paul Clark in Alpine Meadows. Her maiden voyage took her to a new berth in Whistler’s Industrial Park.

Diane Smith (left) and Karen Benoit smile from their ticket wickets where they offer new two-mountain passes for $20/day. Youth can ski both mountains for $15/day and children for $5. These tickets are also available in two, three and five-day packages.

Superset for a super skier. Blackcomb’s Hugh Smythe sits in ‘the chair’ at the Downhill Shop while skitodics expert John Colpitts fits him out with a pair of Superset footbeds.

Whistler’s newest citizens join their moms for a well-baby clinic with Public Health Nurse Marilyn McIvor. From left to right in the front row are Brock Crofton and mom Yvonne, Jaclyn and Suzi McCance, Andrew and Lee Bennett and Alexandra and Donna Liakakos. Behind are Robin and Tamsin Miller, Marilyn McIvor and Trevor and Jean Dally.

What’s new in ski wear this season? Whistlerites got a chance to find out November 26 at the Winter What to Wear fashion show,held at Delta Mountain Inn. Above Andrea Maw and Nigel Woods – a dazzling duo – show off the latest in winter wear.

Betty Jarvis greets visitors Rich, Robin and Tamsin Miller to the opening of Beau’s Restaurant Wednesday.

1984

Trev Roote, chairman of the Advisory Parks and Recreation Commission, became Whistler’s fifth Freeman Monday, in recognition of his five years at the helm of municipal parks development – as a volunteer. Roote, 55, is a West Vancouver businessman, but spent considerable time here first of all finding out what recreation needs are and then, in 1981, gaining referendum approval of $2 million parks spending.

Mike Snetsinger, Whistler Mountain lift attendant, helps a youngster onto the west side rope tow.

Whistler Mountain lift attendant Heather Watson loads ’em on Sunday at the Olive Chair. About 13,000 people skied the mountain on the first big weekend of the ski season.

The owner of the car municipal works foreman Gord Voncina unearthed on Mountainview Drive Monday learned an important lesson: don’t park on the road allowance, and doubly don’t let your car get buried in snow. A grader using back banks Monday morning discovered the car by accident, and it appeared some other driver had already smacked the car.

Wednesday marked a long evening at the Black Forest of roasting and toasting Jenny and Nello Busdon – more fondly known as Nelly and Jello. Representatives from virtually every community group paid tribute to the 17 years of service and dedication the Busdons have contributed to the valley. They leave this week with their children Nicholas and Melanie for Sun Valley.

Remember the huge exposed boulder near the front entrance of The Highland Lodge? Well, now it forms one of the walls inside the entrance way following a $500,000 facelift of the oldest continuously operated lodge in Whistler.

In one of his last official duties as mayor, Mark Angus cuts the ribbon to officially open the Whistler Valley Housing Society Project at the gondola Saturday. He is flanked by John Nicholls, Vancouver branch manager for Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation, and the three ribbon holders: Lisa Koby, Stephanie Simpson and Michele Zinsli. A reception followed in The Keg.

Management consultant David Golinsky spoke last week to Blackcomb Skiing Enterprises’ 120 employees with an eye to upgrading their skills in dealing with customers. Golinsky’s main theme is that employers and employees have to work as a team. He said there are certain basic guidelines for dealing with customers, but at the same time not all tourism programs offer skills needed for specific industries, such as skiing, and part of his purpose is to offer seminars to fit that need. Whistler Mountain has also introduced a similar program for its employees.

Saunas of Whistler

Looking through Whistler publications from the 1970s, it’s easy to see that building and design in Whistler has changed a lot over the decades.  It’s rare today to see a newly constructed A-frame, Gothic arch cabin or a condo advertised using wall-to-wall shag carpeting as a selling point.  Like the shag carpeting and A-frames, saunas also seem to be disappearing from town.

Not all saunas built in Whistler necessarily met the criteria of H.J. Viherjurri, one of the founding members of the Suomen Saunaseura (Finnish Sauna Society), to be considered a true sauna.  He and other members defined a sauna as a room or hut built of wood and containing stones heated by some kind of stones.  These stones heat the air to upwards of 160°F and water can be thrown on the stones to produce steam, called löyly.  Viherjuuri explains that, unlike steam rooms, the air in a sauna remains dry as the moisture is instantly absorbed by the wooden walls of the room.

It’s not clear whether the products in this 1980 California Pool & Spa ad from the Whistler Answer would meet the requirements of a sauna.  Whistler Answer, December 1980.

Also important to be considered a true sauna is the multi-round process of alternately heating and cooling, whether by a cold shower, jumping in a lake or even rolling in snow.  The process often also includes light beating with leafy birch branches to clean the skin.  Without known how saunas built in Whistler were used in the 1970s it is impossible to assume they met the requirements of this definition.  The term sauna was, however, used to attract buyers and visitors to various properties.

In advertisements placed in Garibaldi’s Whistler News the Christiana Inn, Highland Lodge, Cheakamus Inn, Ski Boot Lodge and Whistler Inn all featured the word sauna among their various assets.  The Whistler Inn, described as “an ultra modern, yet rustic lodge” listed their sauna first among their attractions “available for your added enjoyment and comfort”.

Many of the condominiums built around Whistler at the time also included saunas, whether private or shared, for the use of guests and residents.  Blackcomb Condominiums, Telemark Townhouses and Alpenforst condos all had saunas available and the “very deluxe units” of Adventures West included “dishawashers, saunas, washing machines and dryers”.

This living room was used to sell Tamarisk units in 1973; see the massive fireplace and wall-to-wall shag. Garibaldi’s Whistler News, Fall 1973.

Perhaps best known is the example of Tamarisk.  The first phase of Tamarisk, built in 1973, included 146 units, each featuring a sunken living area, a “massive stone fireplace”, shag carpet and a private sauna.

Saunas remained a popular part of aprés-ski culture into the 1980s.  For those who didn’t already have their own sauna Wedge Mountain Construction advertised in The Whistler Answer in December 1980 that they could build one for you.  You could also purchase a freestanding sauna kit from California Pool & Spa for $900.

For a price Wedge Mountain Construction would build a sauna for you. Whistler Answer, December 1980.

Though houses may still contain saunas, many of these rooms are now used for purposes other than bathing.  Growing up in a 1980s house built with one of these wooden rooms, some small children thought sauna was just another word for storeroom.  Rather than attract buyers with the promise of their own private sauna, house listings today are more likely to advertise a Tamarisk unit with a converted sauna.

While saunas may not be nearly as prevalent as during their 1970s ’80s heyday, they can still be found in Whistler at Meadow Park Sports Centre, various hotels, the Scandinave Spa and even some private residences.

This Week in Photos: May 17

1978

The sign says “Turn here Denny”, but who is Denny and where are they going?

A demonstration of the Whistler Volunteer Fire Department’s equipment on the lake.

Gothic arches are getting harder to find in Whistler but in 1978 this one was still standing proudly.

A new council was sworn in for the day.

The staff at Myrtle Philip School. We recognize Jane Burrows and Sandra Epplett, but can anyone help with the rest of the names?

1980

Coral Robinson gets the last of the Roundhouse sunshine on closing day Whistler Mountain May 11.

A lone fireman hoses down a burning mountain of garbage as a nearby tanker truck refills the porta tank.

Lyall Featherstonebaugh slices, slams and pivots through a variety of wave types in the spring-swollen Cheakamus River on Sunday.

1981

The old Muni Hall building gets ready to move away from Blackcomb Way.

Garry Watson presents Doug Sutcliffe with a print of Whistler Village at the Founder Dinner.

Whistler’s founders? Or are they confusing Whistler with Disneyland?

A sunny game of volleyball outside the Highland Lodge.

Whistler’s version of a biker gang – not the most intimidating.

The Muni Hall building in its new location near Function Junction.

1982

Spring clean-up underway in the village included the removal of damaged beams from the Sports and Convention Centre roof. The huge gulls will be used by the municipality for picnic tables, benches and pedestrian footbridges along the trail system.

Const. Sowden talks to young bikers about safety.

View from the Top. Ever wonder what the view is like from the top of a 70 ft. fire truck ladder? It goes something like this, only try and imagine a bit of a sway while you’re standing there. Whistler firemen were taking part in a two-day seminar when they had this equipment out.

Roll me over in the clover… said this little Honda in the middle of Myrtle Philip school field. And so some of the crew repairing the baseball diamond did just that (roll it over, that is) to inspect the underside of the poor thing. Sure beats putting it on a hydraulic lift.

Salad Days! Hungry staff survey the new salad bar at the Creekhouse Restaurant.

1983

Clamouring for the start of Whistler Children’s Festival, this bunch of artists whomped up posters to advertise the event to be held June 18 and 19. Clockwise from the summit: Harley Paul, Melanie Busdon, Marika Richoz, Samantha O’Keefe, Charlene Freeman, Angus Maxwell. Jason Demidoff and Iain Young say they can all hang in until then.

These two answered this week’s question: Dave Cipp, Bartender, White Gold and Karen Playfair, Grocery Store employee, Alpine Meadows.

Road crews were hard at work widening the alignment of Highway 99 west of Green Lake May 13. In three or four years the road to Pemberton should be an easier one to travel.

Following Saturday’s annual general meeting, Jeff Wuoller (left) will sit as the new WRA director-at-large for the coming year, while Jacques Omnes (right) will assume the position of accommodations director.

1984

Grade 5 students from Myrtle Philip School, named in honour of Whistler’s pioneer in 1976, gathered around Mrs. Philip at her home on the shores of Alta Lake.

Leaping horses, Batman! It’s Bob Warner getting warmed up with his trusty steed for another season of trailriding at Whistler which starts this Thursday. This year Layton Bryson is running his operation from new stables at Mons.

Whistler Après: 1968

In February of 1968 entertainment options for locals and visitors were limited.  Alta Lake, as the area was still called, had a very small full-time population and comparatively little infrastructure.  The Village was still serving as a town dump site and development in Creekside had really only just begun.

The development of Creekside and the surrounding areas as of 1970. Whistler Mountain Collection.

The February edition of Garibaldi’s Whistler News included the “Whistler Mountain Weekly Schedule of Entertainment”, a listing of weekly events that were open to the public.  While not a lengthy list (especially when compared to the five pages of listings found under PiqueCal and Nightlife in this publication just last week) every evening provided something different.

The week began on Sunday with a General Information Night where “ski-weekers” were invited to the Cheakamus Inn to view slides of the area and ask any questions they might have about Whistler Mountain.

On Monday a day of skiing could be followed by hot drinks in the Cheakamus Inn lounge and a “Get-Acquainted Party” at the Highland Lodge to meet instructors and others on vacation.

Shown here with his children, Dick Fairhurst was the owner of Cypress Lodge and a ski-doo enthusiast. Fairhurst Collection.

Cypress Lodge (the current site of the Point and Sailing Club) offered Ski-Doo parties every Tuesday, including a ski-doo trip to Cypress Lodge, hot drinks, light refreshments and the option to dance or rent a ski-too to take around Alta Lake.

Wednesdays were Movie Night when a film would be shown in the Day Lodge at the foot of Whistler Mountain.  In 1968 a ticket to the movies was a reasonable $1 for adults and $0.50 for children.

On Thursday the entertainment moved to the Mount Whistler Lodge, a location of fond memories for many Whistler residents and visitors.  Guests were encouraged to come “any time after 9 pm and see the local people in action” with a Jug Band on hand and records for dancing, as well as refreshments and pizza.  According to an advertisement placed by the Mount Whistler Lodge, in which it was described as a “rustic waterfront lodge with rooms and cabins in one of the finest settings in the world,” this was also the place to be every Friday and Saturday for dancing and pizza.

Hillcrest Lodge, originally built and run by the Mansell family, was renamed the Mount Whistler Lodge under new management soon after Whistler Mountain opened.  Mansell Collection.

The February of 1968 offered extra entertainment with two dances scheduled in Whistler Mountain’s main lodge for February 3 and 17, alternating Saturdays with the Mount Whistler Lodge for the month.  Admission to these dances was $1.50 and music was provided by the newly formed Poppy Family.  An added attraction was a “psychedelic lighting show”.

Today there is no shortage of evening entertainment opportunities for visitors to Whistler, including outdoor activities, restaurants, bars and theatres (movie and otherwise), not to mention the events, classes and presentations put on by many local organizations.

The Early Days of Creekside

The community of Alta Lake, which attracted visitors and families with cabins in the summer for hiking, hunting and fishing along the lakefront, was forever changed in 1960.

That year, the Garibaldi Olympic Development Agency, led by Franz Wilhelmsen, chose the valley as the site to bring the 1968 Winter Olympics to Canada and British Columbia.  The failure of this first Olympic bid, while discouraging, did not dissuade the group from deciding to build a world-class ski resort.

A very optimistic sign at the base of Whistler Mountain. Photo: Whistler Mountain Collection

The Garibladi Lift Company installed the first gondola-accessed ski area in North America and opened the ski resort in January 1966.

With the ski resort in operation, the newly formed Chamber of Commerce operated as the local government overseeing the sporadic development surrounding the gondola base. The Garibaldi Lift Company did not have the financial resources to purchase the property around the gondola base allowing others to purchase the land.

With the lack of an official community plan or recognized local government, development went unchecked.  Ski cabins were scattered around the base along with a gas station/grocery store and a telephone exchange.  The Garibaldi Lift Company built an interdenominational skier’s chapel, complete with bells and a memorial stain glass window.

The Cheakamus Inn, the Highland Lodge, Rainbow Lodge and other Alta Lake lodges housed visitors in what had normally been the off-season for the Alta Lake community.  A large development was planned near the shores of Nita and Alpha Lakes.  The development would have included residential and commercial properties as well as more recreational areas such as a curling/skating rink, swimming pool and tennis courts.  A condominium development called Alpine Village sat above the gondola area on the slopes of Whistler Mountain.  The UBC Varsity Outdoor Club began constructing their new club cabin near the gondola base.

Alpine 68 newly constructed in 1968. Condos such as these sprung up around Creekside and Nordic.  Photo: Whistler Mountain Collection

The popularity of skiing also brought long waits to ride the gondola up to the mid-station.  The wait times would sometimes exceed three hours just to get on the gondola, prompting the Garibaldi Lift Company to offer free skiing to those willing to hike to the mid-station.

The parking lots at the base of the gondola were consistently full.  Highway 99 was finally blacktopped between Squamish and Whistler, but the drive was still full of hairpin turns and single lane bridges.  This didn’t stop skiers from driving up from the city.

A full (and colourful) parking lot in Creekside. Photo: Whistler Mountain Collection

The popularity of the ski resort also attracted another group of people to the valley: “hippies” and those involved in the counterculture movement.  Those unable to afford to purchase land or build their own ski cabin would squat on Crown land.

With the RMOW established on September 6, 1975 the chaotic nature of development in Whistler’s early years was over the focus on bringing about the well-planned Whistler Village began.