Tag Archives: hockey

This Week in Photos: February 8

You might have noticed that while the Whistler Question Collection covers the years 1978 – 1985 not all years are shown in This Week in Photos.  The simple explanation is that the photos for some weeks are missing, damaged or in the possession of the photographer.  We’re looking forward to April when we can start sharing more photos of 1978 and 1984!

1979

And they’re off! At the mass start of the Molson Cup race held in Whistler recently.

Whistler hockey players faced the Budget team on Wednesday night and made the front page of the paper!

The new sign at the White Gold Inn (better known today as Whistler’s beloved Boot and Shoestring Lodge) was recently damaged by vandals. After this picture was taken, it was further vandalized.

A red tag and bylaw notice posted on Whistler Vale buildings.

The children’s corner at the new Pemberton Library promises to be well used.

1980

You can’t really tell, but this was the brand new powder blue RCMP vehicle in the valley!

1924-style swimmer Grace at the Pemberton Teachers Frolic – though the costumes look great, what the teachers were up to is anyone’s guess.

Cross country enthusiast Nello Busdon carefully waxes his skis before heading out on the Lost Lake Trail.

1981

THE stop sign in Whistler Village – a newsworthy addition to town.

New Whistler pharmacist Neil Massoud at work in Whistler United Pharmacy.

The Sears catalogue store in Pemberton on the Perkins property that was used up until February 10.

Gay Parker-McCain with baby Dana at the ‘Well Baby Clinic’ with Public Health Nurse Marilyn McIvor.

Manager Rob Nelms stands behind the remodelled bar at Dino’s, now open for business!

1982

The official map of Whistler Village as of 1982. Can you tell what’s still to come?

Competitors are photographed twice in the Pacific Western ProTour held on Blackcomb Mountain.

Vancouver’s Hellenic dancers perform at L’Apres’ Greek Night on February 5.

Ken Thornton of Tapley’s Pub soaks up a few rays while catching up on a little news during Whistler’s recent sunny spell.

Dogcatcher Geoff Playfair who is having a busy time with the Whistler strays.

A snowy view of the Husky and Creekside.

1983

Wowee – it was a hot time in the old town with the swoons and tunes of Vancouver’s R&B All Stars who cranked up the energy level in Delta’s Stumps Lounge to maximum enjoyment last weekend.

A face from yesteryear – Scott Paxton, who worked at The Keg at the Mountain many years ago when it was located in Whistler Cay has now resurfaced at the new Keg as the official “bunmaster”. Paxton and fellow employees geared up for the opening night at The Keg Friday, February 4 for another era of Keg lovers.

Guy Labelle connects one of the power hook ups being installed in the overnight parking lot to make life a little more comfortable for Whistler’s RV visitors. While partial services are now available, full-service pads may be a long time coming.

Heading for the finish must be lot easier when you’ve got wings!

The Brandywine Inn display suite developed a bit of a list as it was being moved off its foundations February 3. Nickel Brothers house movers recovered the situation by jacking up the building and rearranging a wooden ramp which had collapsed under it. The house was enrolee to High Forest.

Mitch Sulkers, Snowcat crew, Blackcomb. Those who answered the Question’s weekly question had their portraits published, often with their occupation and neighbourhood of residence.

1985

Corporate Cup teams ran, hopped, slid and jumped through an obstacle course wearing snowshoes Saturday at Myrtle Philip School.

Ken Domries (right) shows Paul Grilles (middle) and Glen Mitchell how to operate the Whistler Volunteer Fire Department’s ladder truck. The $20,000 LTI pumps out 4,500 litres a minute of water and is usually operated by a five-man crew.

Whistler Mountain day skiers stand in line Saturday for refunds after the power to the north side lift system went out of commission. Inconvenienced skiers were given refunds, food vouchers and hot drinks while the mountain’s staff coaxed the lifts into operation again.

Grand prize winner, Paul Burrows (right), receives his pair of Blizzard Quattro skis from Nigel Woods, president of Coastal Mountain. Unfortunately, the caption for this photo failed to mention what the prize was for.

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Frozen Alta Lake

Winters at Alta Lake were a quiet season for the small community without the crowds of summer visitors.  Whistler Mountain did not open for skiing until 1966 and until then downhill skiing in the valley was uncommon.  Instead winter sports centred on and around Alta Lake.  In addition to cross-country skiing, snowshoeing and sleigh rides, activities that took place on the frozen lake itself were popular within the small community.

Myrtle Philip and Agnes Harrop ice-boating on a frozen Alta Lake. Photo: Philip Collection.

With the right conditions skating was a common pastime that could quickly become a community gathering with a bonfire and marshmallows.

In 1924 Sewall Tapley built an iceboat for his daughter Myrtle after she injured her leg.  He used a few boards, old skate blades and a sail and thus introduced a new activity to Alta Lake.  With a good wind the iceboat could easily outpace the skaters.  While the iceboat did have a tiller attached it was not an effective means of steering.  Instead, Myrtle recalled, “we’d crash into the snow bank on the other side of the lake, get out and turn it around to get home.”  In the 1980s a new generation tried sailing on Alta Lake, this time using “windskiers” which hopefully had much better steering capabilities.

Wind skiing was a new sport for Alta Lake. Photo: Whistler Question Collection, January 1985.

The lake continued to be a community gathering spot for Alta Lake residents through the 1950s and into the 60s.  In the January 5, 1960 edition of the “Alta Lake Echo”, the weekly newsletter put out by the Alta Lake Community Club under various named from January 1958 until June 1961, it was noted that “a good crowd turned out Friday night to skate and spectate at Rainbow Rink.  Cabin 8 was cosy and warm for the less hardy types and those whose feed would not fit the available skates.”  The evening ended with hot dogs and hot chocolate provided by Alex and Audrey Greenwood, then owners of Rainbow Lodge.

The same newsletter also reported on the annual New Year’s hockey game that was postponed “due to poor player condition after New Years Eve.  Rescheduled for 2 pm Jan. 2nd, game commenced promptly at 3:30.”  On the side of the Alta Lake Amatoors were Frantic Fairhurst (foreward front and centre) and Non Stop Crankshaft, Capricious Croaker, Gummed Up Gow and Fearless Ferguson (all playing defence).  The Rainbow Rockets lineup featured Sky Scraper Skip (“centre, right and left, fore and back”), Spud Murphy (“goal defence and generally against Alta Lake making a goal”), Gallopping Greenwood, and GoGetter Gordon.

A game of hockey on frozen 19 Mile Creek, November 1978. Photo: Whistler Question Collection.

Despite having fewer players, Rainbow took an early lead that they kept for a final score of 7-1, though the accuracy of the score is questionable.  According to the sports report, “before the first half of the first quarter was over the judges retired to the warmth of Cabin 8 and the score was rather hard to keep track of.”  Clearly the residents treated this game with the utmost professionalism.

The opening of Whistler Mountain shifted the focus of winter sports away from Alta Lake, though it took only one winter with very little snow to return people to the lakes.  According to the Whistler Question, in January 1977 Whistler Mountain closed due to “adverse weather conditions”.  Instead skating, hockey and even ice stock sliding kept the community busy.

Ice stock sliding, a sport introduced to Alta Lake during a particularly bad snow year, remained popular in Whistler for some time. Photo: Whistler Question Collection, January 1980.

Today, if the lakes have a safe layer of ice, ice skating and hockey games can still be seen on lakes throughout the valley.