Tag Archives: Myrtle Philip School

This Week In Photos: November 15

This week of 1984 includes some photos from Beer League Slo-pitch Banquet.  For more photos of the trophies mentioned, take a look here – some of them are quite interestingly crafted.

1979

The copper pillars of the pub in Package 6 reflect the afternoon sun at Whistler Village.

Three views of the Ski Swap… The crowds of cars outside..

… the crowds of people looking for bargains inside…

… and the RCMP engraving skis as part of their “Ski Watch” program.

Garibaldi Building Supplies’ Franke Desroches proudly displays the winning ticket.

The new town access road that runs past the school property. The new road is about 1.5 metres above the level of the school grounds.

Campbell McGougan and Bob Bates stands beside Alpine Security’s Bronco patrol vehicle.

View of the Rotary Auction as seen from the front of the room. Nandor Pal has just made a bid!

1980

First snow of the season: Sunday Evening, November 9, 1980.

New Guides Carrie Ainsworth, Marisa Gianne, Jodi Rustad and Rya Kirkwood proudly display their badges.

Stuart Remple and Steve Kellough of Salomon and Blackcomb Staffers Elizabeth Bennett and Martin Kimble mount bindings on the new Blackcomb rental skis.

Manager Dennis Lamarche stands in the centre of the new unfinished Whistler Liquor Store.

Gourmet’s Ted Nebbeling heads out with a tray of goodies for the Blackcomb Sports store opening.

A happy Blackcombe Sports staff cuts through the ribbon with a pair of skis as scissors at the store opening ceremonies.

Worker puts finishing touches to new dog pound adjacent to Whistler public works building.

1981

Oh happy days – frosted slopes and free season’s passes from each mountain. Roland Kentel (left), president of Whistler Athletic Society, was pleased to present Rod MacLeod with a pass to Whistler and Cheryl Devine with one to Blackcomb for their top efforts in raising money for the Terry Fox Marathon of Hope; Rod raised $1,260 and Cheryl raised $1,134.

Oops – didn’t think that telephone pole looked like that last night. This one took a nose-dive in the early morning hours of Saturday, November 14, knocking out power in the southern part of the municipality for several hours. BC Hydro said that the rain-soaked earth was at the root of the problem.

Al Raine displays his broadjumping skills for sons Charlie and Willie, an unidentified family friend and the family dog.

Department of Highways worker stands on one of the 44,000 lb. concrete beams that will make up the base of the Bridge at River of Golden Dreams.

Treasurer Gary Raymond plays at the keyboard of the municipality’s new $60,000 Basic MAI system 210 computer. The system is capable of printing 150 lines per minute and storing up to 14 million characters. Tax accountant Kathy Hicks and MAI system analyst Gene Wong look on.

1982

New positions and new faces on Blackcomb Mountain this season include (l – r) Lorne Borgal, Administrative Manager; Rick Morten, Operations Manager; Grant Smith, Vehicle Maintenance Supervisor; Ross Nichol, Comptroller.

A quiet moment in memory of the war dead is observed Thursday, November 11 by members of Whistler RCMP and Whistler Ambulance. (L – R) Denver Snider, Gord Simms, Andrea Lloyd and Jim Scribner observe two minutes of silence after laying a wreath. Any war vets who would be interested in holding an Armistice Day service next year are asked to contact Jim Scribner.

Margate Kogler ‘hams it up’ with a submarine sandwich in the kitchen at the Community Club Fall Fair November 13.

Eugene Rickli displays a selection of his hand-carved cedar faces at the Community Club Fall Fair.

First snowman of the season was being created on November 15 with only the help of a small shovel and a metal spoon. Sculptors are (clockwise from the bottom left): Sam Davies, Pam Pocius, Tim Sereda, Anthony Garm and Nina Lewis.

Ian Boyd, an employee of Whistler Mountain Ski Corp., demonstrates the ins and outs of this SMI snow-making machine Thursday. The machine, which may be put to use on Whistler Mountain this winter, is able to produce enough snow to cover one acre one-half inch deep in one hour.

1984

Smith Brothers Wilson employees poured part of the concrete slab for the Conference Centre’s second floor Friday. Construction crews are racing against the clock to get the second floor and roof completed before the end of the month. The 2,100 person capacity Conference Centre is scheduled to open June 1.

About 75 people attended a brief Remembrance Day ceremony in front of the Tri-Services Building Sunday morning. At precisely 11 am a minute of silence was observed to commemorate those Canadian men and women who died in battle and to give thanks for the peace they fought and died for.

About 1,300 people passed through Myrtle Philip School gym and lunchroom Saturday for the 8th annual Fall Fair organized by Heather Gamache and Catherine Wiens from the Alta Lake Community Club. Although final figures haven’t yet been tabulated, Gamache estimates the club raised close to $1,800 from the fair that featured clothing, jewellery, photography and art and other hand-made crafts.

Sonya McCarthy with a selection of South American clothing she was selling at Saturday’s Fall Fair.

150 people showed up for the last week’s beer league’s slo-pitch banquet, despite weather conditions that were definitely not for baseball. Each team in the league made a trophy for presentation to one of the other teams. Trophies included a No Name brand trophy, a softball/sailboat, and a Muppet-like doll with one rather unMuppet-like feature.

Stoney’s accepts its team trophy. The team won the league championship this year.

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This Week In Photos: November 1

If you’re looking for photos of Halloweens past, look no further than the Whistler Question Collection!

1978

This large pile of building material debris collecting under the power line at Function Junction.

Package #7 – The new Post Office site is identified at the Town Centre with the school in the background.

The western pine log home nearing completion in Alpine Meadows – construction by Canadiana Homes Corp.

1980

Whistler Daycare Hallowe’en Party!

Jack Davey (far right) talks to one of his first customers in his new hardware store in the Town Centre. Only open a week, the store boasts a huge inventory of dry goods from kitchen ware to backyard tools.

Blue Northern belted out the dancin’ tunes to the delight of the 250+ customers that attended the Country Hoedown and Trucker’s Ball in the Blackcomb Maintenance garage. It was the third annual for the Cookhouse Organization.

Member of the fitness awareness squad that visited the school over the weekend chats with Joan Gross as she pedals the specially adapted exercise bike that measures how the body’s cardiovascular system is working.

The Town Centre as it is this last week of October from the north looking south. Parking is now available on the large football field-looking structure to the right. The structures at the bottom left are the employee trailers, the circle in the middle is for dropping passengers at Blackcomb Lodge and Phase Two projects are shown in various states of construction in the middle left.

1981

Auctioneer Paul Burrows offers the giant collage by Chris Speedie for sale at the Ski Team Benefit. The picture fetched a tidy $1,100.

Discussing the benefits of the benefit (l to r): Dennis Waddingham, Steve Podborski, Dave Murray, Toulouse and Deedee Haight of the Alpine Ski Team.

There were bewildering moments for many Whistler residents upon awakening Saturday, October 31 to the sounds of raging creeks. This resident of Panorama Drive in Brio says it all with a shrug – after all, what can you say when there’s a river where there once was none?

Norm Dedeluk (centre) gets more than a helping hand from two fellow volunteer firemen in dislodging debris from raging Brio Creek.

Half of the Myrtle Philip Kindergarten Class – from the left: Kris Jones, Kelly Hamilton, Michael Hoffmann, Simon Beller, Christopher Systad, Aaron Gross, Alexander Fordham and Karen Kogler.

Principal Bob Daly is surrounded by teachers Sue Christopher (left) and Sandra Pauliuk-Epplett all dressed in their Halloween finery.

1982

Smokey Batzer demonstrates artificial resuscitation techniques to employees of the Delta Mountain Inn.

And the winner is… Steve Podborski draws the lucky number of the grand prize winner at the Canadian National Ski Team Benefit as Dennis Waddingham looks on. The benefit was held October 29 at L’Apres.

His Honour Dave Murray passes royal judgement on the winning costume at Araxi’s first birthday party Sunday, October 31. Lucky Andre walked away with $100 for his light and airy costume, which just may give the mountains some bright ideas for transporting skiers.

Halloween brought all kinds in all sorts of outfits into Whistler Village October 30 and 31. Revellers whooped it up at Nasty Jack’s Halloween Party and Bullets Cabaret.

What better way to end an evening of trick or treating than being treated to Whistler’s third annual Halloween fireworks display, put on by the Whistler Volunteer Fire Department.

Provincial crews began taking apart the Bailey bridge which spans the River of Golden Dreams at Highway 99. Work on the dismantling job began November 1.

1983

Members of the Canadian Olympic Soccer Team gathered in Myrtle Philip playing field Tuesday after training on top of Whistler Mountain Monday. Twenty-one players and coaching staff head to Mexico City Saturday to battle against the Mexican national team which they defeated 1-0 in Victoria. The Canadian team must draw or win against Mexico to advance to the next round in the Olympic qualifying matches. Good luck lads!

Gruesome monster Davey Blaylock tricked and treated with timid lion Jake Humphrey and hideous Swamp Thing Aaron Gross. Students of Myrtle Philip School paraded before parents in the gym before going off to Halloween parties in their classrooms.

One of the, ah, more penetrating costumes worn by a reveller in the Mountain House.

It was a Monday full of goblins, ghouls and costumes as Whistlerites celebrated Halloween around the village. Kids and parents watch fireworks in front of the Tri-Services Building put on by the Volunteer Fire Department. Coffee and a huge log fire kept everyone warm as they oohed and aahed the well-organized fireworks display.

The first crests and embroidered garments will soon be rolling off a computerized embroidery machine at Function Junction. Owners Jan Holmberg and Ted Nebbeling paid $80,000 for the Japanese-made machine that has twelve sewing heads.

1984

Antonio Pellin from Custom Paving takes a 16 tonne compacting machine to Highway 99 at Village Gate Boulevard in preparation for the final paving and installation of a traffic light at the intersection. Once the work is completed this month, Whistler will have its first traffic light and the intersection will have an extra lane for turning into the village from both north and south.

About 12 cm of powdery snow covered the valley Tuesday in the first major snowfall of the season. A group of local women decided to herald the unofficial beginning of winter by building a ‘snow-woman’ in Village Square Tuesday. The ‘snow-woman’ featured brussel sprouts for a mouth, potatoes for eyes and a carrot for the nose.

Youngsters at Myrtle Philip School had their first frolic in the snow Tuesday morning, arriving at the school to fine their friends as well as about 12 cm of fresh new powder.

This Week In Photos: October 25

We may have just finished our latest municipal election but, as some of these photos show, new councils used to be elected in November.  This week (like most weeks in the 1970s and ’80s) also includes construction, community events and even a puppy!

1979

A section of the new concrete curbing recently installed by the Highways crews just south of Whistler.

The new Public Safety building starts to take shape as the snow creeps down Whistler Mountain behind.

Grant Couture stands beside the horses he plans to have available for riding and sleigh rides at Rainbow Lodge.

Colin Chedore – the new Marketing Manager for the Whistler Village Land Company.

The Whistler Skiers Chapel is moved to its new location adjacent to the Whistler Mountain Ski Club cabin.

1980

Three of the original Witsend owners! (Left to right) Jacquie Pope, Kelly Fairhurst and Florence Petersen.

Blackcomb’s President and General Manager Hugh Smythe shows Whistler Mayor Pat Carleton the new ski runs from the base of Lift 2 during a recent tour by the mayor of the Blackcomb facilities.

“I have a home, but my brothers & sisters are still looking!” If you are interested call Pauline.

“Keep going thataway!” Parent Helper Candy Rustad directs the participants in the recent cross-country run hosted by the Myrtle Philip School.

Owners Ted Nebbeling and Jan Holmberg get ready for another busy day in the Gourmet Bakery and Fine Food store.

Nancy Raine and Raymond Lanctot stand in front of the Rossignol booth at the Vancouver Ski Show.

1982

Puzzled? The Whistler Information sign and map took a tumble Friday, October 22 during high winds, just missing the info centre. Foundation posts had apparently rotted.

Hats of all kinds turn up these days at Myrtle Philip School. The fashion = keeping away from lice.

Volunteers check children for head lice, which have reached epidemic numbers in Whistler.

Mayor Carleton got exposure to more than a brief interlude of sun Thursday when CTV interviewer Cynthia Ott arrived in Whistler to ask some questions.

On your marks; get set – three candidates (Mark Angus, Sid Young and Ruth Lotzkar) enjoy a laugh after handing in nomination papers October 25 for the November 20 municipal election.

The Candidates – Whistler Chamber of Commerce President Jim Gruetzke introduces Sid Young (a mayorality candidate), Craig MacKenzie, Mark Sadler and David O’Keefe (aldermanic candidates) at an afternoon wine and cheese held October 24 at Delta Mountain Inn.

Onlookers ask Craig Tomlinson about the history and construction of a lute he is holding.

Mark Angus calls ’em as Will Moffatt checks numbers during the Whistler Parent Teacher Committee Bingo Nite at Myrtle Philip School October 22.

New members of the Health Planning Society Board, from left: Kathy Hicks (Treasurer), Tim Woods (Director), Rolley Horsey (Vice President), Criag MacKenzie (President) and Fred Barter (Director).

1983

Valdy rolled into town Sunday, a little tardy for his show at Myrtle Philip Elementary Sunday night but the unavoidable delay was soon forgotten by the 175 adults and children gathered to see the versatile entertainer. Valdy played old songs and new ones with his gigantic light bulb shedding light on the subject.

Parks crew workers installed subdivision signs all along Highway 99 Monday and Tuesday. Originally built by Al Bosse last winter, the municipality had to negotiate with the provincial highways department to receive permission to erect the signs within 50 feet of the highway. Signs are constructed out of fir and have electrical cords installed for possible light fixtures in the future.

Pemberton Mayor Shirley Henry displays a plaque indicating the federal government’s involvement in getting the Pemberton Airport on track. The airport, 36 years in the making, was officially opened last Friday. Mayor Henry says the airport will be able to serve the Whistler area.

1984

Members of the Whistler Rotary Club are raising money for their programs this fall by selling firewood. Working Saturday to fill remaining orders are, left to right: Bill Wallace, Don MacLaurin, Bob Brown, Paul Burrows, Richard Heine, Brian Brown, Sid Young and a visiting Rotarian from New Zealand.

The Baxter Group’s condo development in the gondola area is just the beginning, and planners are now deciding how work in the rest of the area will proceed.

Lorne Borgal, president of Whistler Mountain Ski Corporation, introduced a slide presentation celebrating the 20th year of incorporation for the firm at the Granville Island Hotel Thursday. A reception preceded and followed the catchy slide show attended primarily by members of the ski industry in Vancouver.

Burning debris coming out of a chimney at this Drifter Way house started a fire that caused an estimated $50,000 damage according to Whistler’s fire chief Lindsay Wilson. The blaze was reported at 9 pm Monday and was brought under full control within 45 minutes. At the time, no one was in the house, which belongs to Kelly Fairhurst.

The Canadian National Ski Team added $2,500 towards training more World Cup Winners through funds raised at Whistler Mountain’s Mouton Cadet Spring Festival this year. Dave Murray, director of skiing for Whistler Mountain, presents the cheque to (l-r) national team members Felix Belzyck, Chris Kent and Gary Athans. New men’s coach Glenn Wuertele was also on hand at the Vancouver Ski Show where the cheque was presented. National team members such as Todd Brooker, Dee Dee Haight, Rob Boyd, Mike Carney, Wade Christie, as well as Belzyck and Athans will also be at the October 31 ski team benefit at Dusty’s in Whistler.

This Week In Photos: October 18

As we get further into each year we’re looking forward to seeing when the first snow fell.  This week photos of snow in the valley turned up in 1982, 15 days later than 2018’s first snow on October 2.

1979

Tuesday night craft class – one of the many Adult Education courses currently being offered at the Myrtle Philip School. Left to right: Inge Neilsen, Jenny Busdon, Ruth Howells, Marilyn Willoughby and Kelly Fairhurst.

The logging truck that burned near Green Lake on Thursday.

Whistler Creek Lodge showing where the worker fell off the roof on Friday.

Cartoonist Tom Thomson stands in front of his cabin in White Gold Estates with the sign put up by the Whistler realtors in answer to his cartoon of September 26.

Edith Iles (right) makes her speech before giving Gay Guthrie the “Endurance Award”.

1980

Fire Chief Lindsay Wilson shows the Myrtle Philip kindergarten class the workings of one of the Whistler fire trucks. The visit was in recognition of National Fire Prevention Week.

The town shapes up! The addition of curbs and paving in front of the town centre approach really sets it off against the new snow on the mountains behind.

Long weekend parking problem! New curbs create a traffic problem outside the Whistler liquor store on Saturday just before closing.

The view of the Whistler United Pharmacy, now open for business in the Blackcomb Professional Building in the centre of Whistler Village.

Whistler’s first paved ski area parking lot! Grandview Blacktop crew paves the day skier parking lot in front of the base area daylodge.

This giant saw blade decorated and donated by Germaine Degenhardt is one of the prizes to be sold off at the Pemberton Lions Club auction on Thursday, October 23.

1982

A Whistler wonderland appeared overnight Sunday, October 17 with the season’s first snow in the valley.

DeMolay youngsters take full advantage of the first snow of the season and run through a very crisp game of flag football Sunday.

The world was someone’s living room – so who needs a TV when you can sit and watch the crowds stroll by in the municipal parking lot.

Newcomers and old-timers enjoyed tea and nibbles at the second annual Welcome to Whistler Tea put on by the Alta Lake Community Club in Blackcomb Lodge Sunday.

Whistler Council shows the signs of a gruelling three-hour public hearing held to discuss bylaws for the equestrian centre October 18.

Rich Miller outside Granny’s Food Emporium, which will open in Whistler November 1.

Pierre Trudeau, insulation contractor, Alpine Meadows.

1983

Connie Kutyn dismantles the stage in Village Square that helped feature entertainers all summer long. She and Al Bosse built it earlier this spring.

Two friends watch from the stands…

… as their classmates get started in the meet.

Winners of the Fire Prevention Week poster contest are, left to right: Madeleine Demries (gr. 3), Nicola Dedeluk (gr. 6), Jocelyn Willoughby (kindergarten) and Rachel Roberts (gr. 5), all students at Myrtle Philip Elementary School.

Building a log cabin is traditional work using a minimum number of modern conveniences. David Stary chisels a section to fit precisely the log beneath.

Whistler residents were delighted Wednesday to hear of $7.8 million worth of completion plans for the long empty convention centre. Plans for the building include a completely refurbished roof, atrium, theatre and tall, bright banners to orient visitors to its location.

1984

Part of the aftermath of last week’s severe flooding in Pemberton.

Farmer Tom Kempter lost close to 150 tonnes of hay when flood waters destroyed it last week. Kempter lost two-thirds of his winter feed for his livestock.

Tracy Comber was one of the many Whistler volunteers who flocked to Pemberton to help with the massive clean-up job. She helped with cleaning equipment at the flood-ravaged Pemberton High School which sustained about $500,000 in damage.

Whistler’s slo-pitch league almost became snow pitch this season, but Stoney’s pulled ahead before the flakes fell and won the championship in the 19-team league. Saturday’s championship game against the Gourmet Rainbow Reefers saw the Stoney’s crew win 14 to 8, and had some observers calling the league the Beer and Whine league by the end. Next year should be another interesting season as the Tapley A’s make their long awaited slo-pitch debut. Left to right: Norm Trottier, Lance Fletcher, Marianne Hardy, Dave Kipp, Paul Liakakos, Tim Malone, Val Jazic, Will Moffat, Sue Christopher, Dave Murphy, Barb Simpson, Wendy Jazic and Ron McCready.

This Week In Photos: October 11

This week had some major events in the 1980s, some of which resemble things happening in Whistler today.  For more photos of the construction of Lift No. 6 (Jersey Cream) on Blackcomb take a look here.  For more photos of the 1984 floods, check here.

1978

A quiet day at Garibaldi Building Supplies Ltd. in Function Junction.

Dancing was a must at the recent Quonset hut party, and few people were left off the dance floor.

Diners fill their plates at the Community Club dinner this past weekend.

1979

The game is on! Students from Signal Hill play the Myrtle Philip School soccer team on Wednesday.

Construction of the town centre continues as this building stands alone.

Builder and artist, Trudy Salmhofer decorates one of her new chalets in Blackcomb Estates.

Lorne O’Connor (left) from the Vancouver Olympic Committee and Whistler alderman Rolly Harsey lead the visiting C.O.A. delegates from the plane on Saturday. Following behind are Frank Shaugnessy and Cliff Powell, both from Montreal.

1980

The dinner part of the Community Club dinner & dance hosted in the Myrtle Philip School gym.

Paul and Jane Burrows take a turn around the the floor.

Kelly and Max Maxwell with their new daughter Fiona at the Community Club dinner.

Whose legs were on display at the dinner?

The Whistler Liquor Store has a curb outside but there still remains some paving to be done.

RCMP & wrecker crews remove the van from the fast flowing Lillooet River.

1982

Whistler’s future firefighters examine the tools of the trade at Myrtle Philip School.

Crowds swarmed to Whistler Village over the Thanksgiving weekend to enjoy some sun and relaxation.

Chop-chop! Dozens of Whistlerites took advantage of a stockpile of free timber left on the slopes of Blackcomb Mountain after trail clearing operations. The mountain was open to the public Saturday and Sunday.

Sikorski S61 chopper lifts cement for the tower pads of Blackcomb’s new Lift No. 6.

Worker welds part onto tower head assembly due to be installed on Lift No. 6, under construction on Blackcomb Mountain.

It’s a dog’s life at the pound when your master hasn’t shown up yet to pay the fine and bring you home again.

Sergeant Jim Hogarth settles into his new duties as head of the Whistler RCMP detachment. With 17 years on police forces, Hogarth brings a good deal of experience to the position. He resides in Emerald Estates with his wife and two daughters.

1983

It was a case of a bridge too high and a house too wide last Thursday at the Fitzsimmons Creek Bridge in White Gold. Although the house owned by Len and Patty Richie was eventually moved from Garibaldi Estates to Lot 30 on Ambassador Crescent, it couldn’t go by the bridge for more than six hours.

House mover Bob Malaughney takes a chainsaw to one of three bridge-posts (one had already been ripped off) that have to be removed.

And resting behind it all on a beam supporting the house was the fragile bird’s nest.

John Robinson puts final touches on his MDC home with help of wife Diane and daughter Kristal.

1984

Pat Carleton, ex-mayor of Whistler, came out of the closet Sunday to join aldermanic candidates Paul Burrows and Nancy Wilhelm-Morden in celebrating the official opening of Whistler’s new municipal hall. The building, which was opened six weeks ago, was formerly used by Keg Restaurants, relocated and later renovated at a cost of $492,000.

Passersby saw the Soo River leap its banks on Highway 99 close to Pemberton Monday, but highway crews soon had the river under control.

Fifteen loaded freight cars were forced off the B.C. Rail track just north of Pemberton after the Lillooet River eroded material supporting ties and tracks. The railcars were part of a 96-car freight train southbound when the accident occurred early Monday morning. Elsewhere in Pemberton, houses, farmland and roads were flooded badly, but by Tuesday afternoon the flood was on the wane, although more rain was forecast.

Pemberton fire chief Milt Fernandez, who supervised rescue and flood control operations in the besieged town, takes a moment out at the rescue centre for victims of the Meager Creek disaster. Fernandez and other rescue workers laboured around the clock Monday and Tuesday before outside help arrived to push back the rising waters. But Pemberton wasn’t the only victim of torrential rains.

In Whistler, two log jams developed on the Cheakamus River and by Tuesday had reached a precarious point. Mailoch and Moseley logging company employees survey a major buildup at the garbage dump bridge six miles south of Whistler. Clean up operations began Tuesday night.

School Days in Whistler

The community of Whistler has undergone many changes in the last hundred or so years, and nowhere is this more evident than in our elementary schools.

When the first non-indigenous settlers began to make their homes around Alta Lake in the early twentieth century, there was no school- no infrastructure at all, in fact. The first school was built in 1931 as a community effort. Over $300 was raised from the small collection of residents- impressive at a time when a litre of milk cost ten cents! The Alta Lake School was fairly bare-bones.  It was warmed by an iron stove and had a nearby creek as a water source and gas lamps for light.

ARTICLE ALTA LAKE SCHOOL ACCESS WMA_P88_001 R JARDINE

Whistler’s first class photo, at Alta Lake School in 1933. Photo: Jardine Collection.

Ten students had to attend in order for the school to be funded by the government.  Only nine were then available at the time, so one boy, Jack Jardine, was persuaded to come for a half-day every week. Teachers today dream of small class sizes but this lack of students became the Alta Lake School’s curse. The school would close in 1946, reopen in 1951, close in 1962, reopen in 1964 and close for good in 1970 as families moved in and out and the number of children fluctuated. One teacher, Mel Carrico, was even hired on the condition that his four children attend the school.

As the permanent population grew following the opening of Whistler Mountain, the school was able to stop it’s constant reopening and closing. In 1976 a new school named Myrtle Philip School was built at today’s location of the Delta Village Suites. Though it opened with only 57 students, the students soon began to outgrow the school and an addition and then eight portables were added.  In 1992 the students were moved to the new Myrtle Philip Community School at its current location on Lorimer Road.

The first Myrtle Philip School at the beginning of the school year, 1978. Photo: Whistler Question Collection.

Whistler was now faced with a constantly growing student population. In 1999, Myrtle Philip had 10 portables, housing half the school’s population. Anyone who’s had class in a portable can tell you that while fine on paper, they’re not ideal – they’re small, are often too hot or too cold, and have no water supply (especially noticeable when walking out to the washroom in a blizzard). Grade 7s  had been moved to Whistler Secondary when it opened in 1996 and soon the high school was in need of portables too. It was decided that a second elementary school was needed, and in 2001 the Howe Sound School Board began to draw boundaries for catchments of the two schools.

This resulted in some conflict – the new school needed half the youth of Whistler to attend, but not everyone lived with easy access to Spring Creek and there were worries about longer commutes and more cars on the road. Boundaries were eventually decided on and building could commence.

This wasn’t as simple as it sounded. The school was initially slated to open September 2001, but this was pushed back multiple times- first to September 2002,  then January 2003, then again to November 2003, then finally January 2004, as funding was secured and construction completed.

The wait was worth it. The new school boasted new science and art rooms, a computer lab, a well-stocked library, and, after a few years, a French Immersion program.

Spring Creek Elementary, Whistler’s newest school.  Photo: Olivia Brocklehurst.

Finding ten children to attend school in Whistler is no longer a problem. Whistler’s students now attend four elementary schools – Myrtle Philip, Spring Creek, École la passerelle and the Whistler Waldorf School. Even now discussions are beginning again about the possibility of a new school as Spring Creek. From the days of one-room schoolhouses to multiple school buildings, education in Whistler has certainly changed, though it remans an important part of community life.

This Week In Photos: September 6

1979

The hydrant stands alone! The clearing adjacent to the school where the new access road will run.

Haus Heidi, one of the honourable mentions in the Garden Contest.

Ester Wunderly models the latest fashions…

… while Dave Murray, sawing through a ski, is helped by Casey Niewerth at the Skyline Sports’ new 6,000 sq. ft store opening in Kerrisdale, Vancouver.

Joanne stands behind the counter of the new Spud Valley Sporting Goods Store.

1980

Town Centre site stands virtually deserted due to work stoppage which began Thursday, August 28.

As in many cases, you’ve got to start at the bottom to get to the top. In this picture we have the crew putting the cable on the Garibaldi Lifts’ chairlift that rises from the Town Centre. Also shown is the pit that the two-mountain daylodge will rise from. It won’t be completed this year but the substructure will and portable trailers will be used on site to sell lift tickets to Whistler and Blackcomb.

A jumper unfolds their flip into Lost Lake.

Dance competitors took to the floor for the University of Whistler dance contest. The winners were Chris Speedie and June Everett.

Linda Satre accepts another donation to the Terry Fox fund from a patron outside the Husky Station while Ruth Howells looks on.

1982

It was a tough weekend of close plays, but when all the dust settled in this weekend’s slow pitch tourney Tapley’s were the winners.

He flies through the air with the greatest of ease… Oh the joys of being airborne… especially when you’ve just hurtled down the aerial ramp at Lost Lake. But oh, the chill of it all once you hit that water. Eleven competitors took part in this year’s aerial acrobatic competition.

Cris Simpson and Duncan Maxwell sharpen their pencils for the first lesson of the term at Myrtle Philip Elementary School.

Busy little bees and industrious beavers welcome students to Miss Christopher’s classroom.

It was no easy task, but for the second year in a row Stoney’s team walked away with first-place honours in the Great Waters Race. (L to R) Dave Murray, Jinny Ladner, Ken Hardy, Lisa Nicholson and Brian Allen.

Bears have been a problem for businesses located in Whistler’s Industrial Park. Provincial wildlife traps are catching more than the normal number of ornery critters.

1983

Caller Ken Crisp led members of the Swinging Singles Square Dance Club in Village Square Saturday and Sunday. Garters were prominently on view as women twirled in their colourful square dancing dresses. The club has more than 300 members and is based in the Burnaby Lake Pavilion.

Relief map of proposed Powder Mountain ski area. Number areas are townsites, white lines are ski runs, and dark lines are ski lifts. Photo was taken at the Vancouver office of Powder Mountain Resort Ltd., where the relief map is stored.

Some kids got right back into the swing as Myrtle Philip School re-opened Tuesday, September 6 but Michael Hoffmann seems to be thinking of other things as Yann Omnes looks on. Sandy Pauliuk-Epplett, meanwhile, starts the rest of the Grade 2 and 3 class off on the right foot by explaining first day back-to-school rules and suggesting school supplies. Motorists, take extra caution now as the little ones head back to school.

Ross Smith, General Manager, Stoney’s, White Gold.

1984

The Fraser Valley Round and Square Dance Association entertained village visitors all weekend long. The dancers even convinced spectators in Village Square to take part in their traditional dance routines. Hundreds of visitors flocked to Whistler for the Labour Day weekend and the village came in with an occupancy rate of 62 per cent in August.

The Conference Centre is expected to be finished by May 1985 and will be one of only two facilities built for conferences in BC.

Angus Maxwell, 10 years old, was the lucky winner of a Red Baron BMX bicycle, presented here by Barb Stewart of the Pharmasave. The drugstore received dozens of entries for the contest.

Tuesday was the first day of classes for local students. Myrtle Philip School opened its doors to 111 students and the Grade 2 and 3 class, taught by Sandy Pauliuk-Epplett, saw classes end at 11:30 am rather than 3 pm.

Vandals hit the former Mountain House Cabaret Friday night, kicking apart a fence and tearing down a wooden sign. Although about $100 worth of damage was done, the vandals apparently saved the new owner the task of removing the Mountain House sign.

Paul and Jane Burrows returned to Whistler last Tuesday after spending more than a year travelling around the globe. The couple’s dog Simba hardly even noticed that the trekkers, who travelled by horse, train, bus, helicopter and even car to South Africa, France, New Zealand and Tahiti (to name but a few stops) were gone. Late summer also saw the return of Al and Nancy Raine after spending the last two years in Crans Montana, Switzerland.