Tag Archives: Skiing

This Week In Photos: August 16

1978

Just because it’s summer doesn’t mean aerial practice ends.

Mayor Pat Carleton stands by one of the Municipality’s trucks, complete with the Municipality’s logo. (In a side note, the “City Hall” sign hanging above the trailer’s door has recently been added to our archives.)

The Christiana Inn is currently closed to the public, as this sign makes clear.

1979

Fire Chief Lindsay Wilson puts up one of the many No Campfire signs now appearing in the Whistler area due to the extreme fire hazard rating.

One V.W. easy over! Stewart McQuarrie of North Vancouver escaped uninjured when he lost control of his car near Daisy Lake.

Stevenson workers work on Package 5 while the piledriver works on #6 at the Whistler Town Centre.

The new temporary addition trailer to the Whistler Municipal Hall.

Neal Davidge shows Rotary President Doug Read the location of Nanisivik in the Arctic.

1980

Cover this turret with copper, fix up the other finishing touches, and put it on top of Parcel 16 and you’ve got Whistler’s very own clock tower. The clock is visible as skiers head down the chairlifts of either mountain.

Two members of the party unload skis off the sea plane at Garibaldi Lake before heading up the route.

A lone skier descends down the glacier to Garibaldi Lake.

Peter Chrzanowski stands in one of the warm mini-lakes at the foot of the glacier. Camera’s lens is 1/2 submerged causing a strange distortion below the water’s surface.

Like toothpaste from the tube, cement oozes from a hose handled by a construction worker as he balances along the top of the “dressing room walls” of the Resort Centre.

1981

Whistler Question publisher Paul Burrows loads one of the 40 bags of mail that left the Post Office on August 12 after the mail strike was over.

FIRE! Lightning strike sets fire to Rainbow Mountain Ridge. Sunday afternoon cocktail sippers got this view from Stoney’s terrace.

Hilda Davey and daughter-in-law Nancy smilingly await the arrival of the new soft ice cream machine at Hilda’s Deli which recently re-opened in the Village centre.

L&A Contracting CAT 225 loader sits in the waters of Green Lake after road widening ledge collapsed on August 11.

Dave Cathers exhibits fine form during the mixed double finals at the Inside Out Tennis Tournament.

The swimmers and sunbathers on the beach and the new dock.

1982

Bon Voyage! The Raine family – Al, Nancy and twin boys Charley and Willy – gather on their front porch for a parting shot shortly before leaving for Switzerland Sunday, August 22.

Petanque player shows his form while President of the Whistler Petanque Club, Jean Jacques Aaron, looks on.

Thieves were determined to get into the office of Whistler’s Husky station as this battered door evidences.

Whistler’s original sluggers, Doc A’s, took part in the Pemberton Ladies’ Invitational Softball Tourney August 14 – 15. (L – R, top row) Brillo, Jan Simpson, Kathy Hicks, Linda Henderson, Cathy Dickinson. (L – R, bottom row) Barb Simpson, Valerie Lang and Laura Nedelak. Missing – Ann Chaisson, Katie Rodgers, Jan Haldimand and Wendy Meredith.

New owners of The Going Nuts Shop (l – r) Brenda and Doug Horton and Chuck and Claire Kingzett take a break from busy preparations.

1983

Jerome Rozitis, right, took first place and Andrew O’Keefe second in the Children’s Triathlon Saturday.

The Whistler Community Arts Council sits with collection boxes for a Book Drive and Auction, while also advertising the Class of ’83’s Arts & Crafts Show.

It was a hot time in the old town of Whistler August 12 – 14 as jazz musicians and their fans poured into the valley for Jazz on the Mountain. Skies stayed sunny and spirits soared, including Larry Coryell’s. A pioneer jazz fusion and one of the most innovative performers featured at the three-day event, Coryell cranked it out with saxophonist Richie Cole and blues belter Ernestine Anderson for a real show-stopper Sunday afternoon. J. Bartosik photo.

Whistler’s new $15,000 tent had its inauguration during the August 12 – 14 jazz festival, much to the pleasure of 4000 jazz buffs who turned out for the event held at the base of Whistler Mountain. Friday night’s concert, offered at no charge, featured the stylings of West Coast Jazz Orchestra and Vancouver Ensemble of Jazz Improvisation in Village Square. At press time, no official report had been released on the financial outcome of the festival.

1984

Cyclists in Friday evening’s White Gold criterium race averaged about 37 km/h in the 50 km event. Ninety-three racers from the Lower Mainland, the rest of Canada and other parts of the world took part in the criterium, which was part of a five-event series that ended Sunday in Gastown.

Whistler windsurfer Sue Cameron picked up four medals at the Western Hemisphere Championships (District 11) on Chestier Lake in Calgary over the weekend. Cameron, who plans to enter professional competition, placed high in three separate events to pick up the overall crown. The championships will be aired on September 8 on CTV.

The Melloyds, an a cappella group, grabbed the spotlight as one of the most entertaining acts during the weekend Music Festival.

A wide variety of musical acts took part in the festival, including Olatunjia (a band featuring African drums and dancing), Mojo and Vancouver’s Jim Byrnes, who created a local following after just one show.

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Crafts in the Park is starting up again!

We’re super excited to announce that Crafts in the Park are starting up again! Every  Thursday starting July 5th, the Whistler Museum and the Whistler Library will be hosting fun and free craft activities in Florence Petersen Park from 11 to 12 am. Kids of all ages can learn about Whistler’s history, enjoy a story, and get creative with one of our amazing crafts.

Our theme this year is “Whistler Through the Ages”. People have been coming to Whistler for over one hundred years in the pursuit of seasonal fun- from the first visitors to Rainbow Lodge in 1914, who came out to ride, fish, and sail, or the crowds that gathered in 2010 to cheer on the Olympic athletes. Our crafts this year are based on activities enjoyed in Whistler past and present.

July 5th

The first settlers in Whistler came here to hunt and trap animals for food, and for their furs. We’ll  be making multimedia animal collages, using foam, felt, paper, magazines, tissue paper, fake fur, and more.  Whistler has an amazing variety of wildlife (bears, squirrels, and everything in between) so what animal will you make?

Animal Collage Craft.jpg

July 12th

Alta Lake became a popular fishing destination in 1914. People caught fish of all kinds.  Just like those early tourists, we’ll be making our own mini fishing rods and fish. You’ll even be able to catch these fish with your rod. Design these fish however you want – rainbows are never a bad idea!

Fish Craft.jpg

July 19th

For this craft, we’re collaborating with the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre. We’ll learn about the relationships between animals and people in Pacific Northwest First Nations culture, and the ways we can identify with animals to understand the world around us. The children will make their own animal headdresses, and participate in a drumming song.

July 26th

Sailing has been popular in Whistler since its early days and Alta Lake residents enjoyed taking all kinds of boats out in the summer. We’ll be making our own sailboats out of sponges, corks, and paper. Just like real boats, these really float, and you’ll even get a chance to try them out on the water.

Boat Craft.jpg

August 2nd

Rainbow Lodge at one time had a stable of 20 horses, and many visitors enjoyed trail rides and trail picnics during their stays. We’ll be making cut-out paper horses with moveable joints. Though you can’t take these horses out for a ride, they’re a fun, poseable homemade toy. And although Whistler’s never been home to any unicorns (as far as we know) you can go ahead and make one of those too.

horse craft2.jpg

August 9th

Whistler boasts several beautiful golf courses and this craft is a fun spin on one of Whistler’s favourite sports. We’ll be making kinetic golf ball paintings, using golf balls to roll the paint across the paper. These painting are fun to do and look even cooler.

Golf Ball Craft.jpg

August 16th

Skiing began in Whistler in the early 1960s and has been wildly popular ever since. We’ll be making paper doll skiers and snowboarders, and using paper and fabric to dress them up warmly against Whistler’s freezing winters.

Ski People Craft2.jpg

August 23rd

Whistler was proud to host the Olympics in 2010 when Canada won gold on home turf for the first time. We will be making our own personalized Olympic medals using foam stamp printing and metallic glitter. Win gold in your favourite sport, or even make up your own!

So come out and join us at Crafts in the Park, every Thursday from 11 to 12 in Florence Petersen Park!

This Week In Photos: May 24

The Victoria Day Weekend in Whistler during the 1980s (and late 1970s) was all about May Day Madness and one of Whistler’s favourite races: the Great Snow, Earth, Water Race!  Photos of the events dominate these weeks in the Whistler Question Collection for each year.

1978

Mayor Pat Carleton welcomes Captain James Cook in front of the mural decoration at the Myrtle Philip School gym.

Two of the Burnt Stew Beavers paddle furiously in the Great Snow, Earth, Water Race.

While May Day Madness shirts are on sale from the Whistler Answer.

The May Day Madness continues with sack races on the school yard with divisions for children, males and females.

An anonymous diver showing fine form in the bellyflop contest.

1980

The canoe portion of the Great Snow, Earth, Water Race heads out on Alta Lake.

A runner nears the finish line at the school.

The winning team Helvetia: Heinz Zurcher, Kaarina Engelbrecht, Franz Bislin, Kathy Zurcher and Josef Bislin.

Chris Carson gives his rendition of “Bobby McGee” with help from Scott Richard, Greg Beauregard, Matt Satre, Marcello Gianna, Mr. Marshall and an all-girl chorus.

The Whistler Village continues to be a work-in-progress.

1981

The Keg building hits the road on its way to its new home on Blackcomb Way.

Constable F. Pinnock runs through the bike safety testing course that he and Constable Gabriel of Pemberton set up at Myrtle Philip Elementary on Friday, May 22. Young participants in the recent “Bike for Life” mini-course and several Girl Guides successfully rose their bicycles through the obstacle course to earn certificates for their cycling expertise.

Kurt and Maralyn Snook cut the cake at their going-away party in Stoney’s back room on Friday, May 22.

Andrew Wuolle, Sherida Snook, Morag Marshall and Jody Rustad planting one of the many Douglas fir trees around Myrtle Philip Elementary school yard on May 22. Tree seedlings were donated by the Ministry of Forests.

1983

Sports fans turned out in droves to dig through the used equipment at Blackcomb Ski Club’s sports swap during May Day Madness. The $1000 raised from sales will go towards building a club facility.

They’re off to a Le Mans starts for the Eighth Annual Snow, Earth, Water Race in Whistler May 22.

This fleecy rider just stopped in for a while to observe the scene at the Great Snow, Earth, Water Race. While master checked out some of the canoe action down by the river, moto-mutt stayed with the steed.

Though not in first place, the Burnt Stew Beavers were back for another race!

For many more photos of the Great Snow, Earth, Water Race take a look here and see if you recognize anyone!

Jeff Wuolle serves up pancakes to some of Whistler’s finest flat feet Saturday morning. Being served are (l to r) Constables Steve Davidson, Richard Guay, Rocky Fortin and Gord Simms. Rotary netted $231 from its pancake sales.

Chefs, firemen and event E.T. turned out at the bike decorating contest Saturday with some fantastically creative ideas. Most Original: Christopher Forrest, on a fire truck complete with hose. Funniest: Stephanie Simpson as The Egg. Prettiest: Melanie Busdon as Miss Strawberry Shortcake.

1984

The long weekend was highlighted by dozens of events including a grueling mountain bike race Monday…

Three days of serenading by a group of wandering minstrels, The Extraordinary Clown Band…

And the exciting ninth annual Great Snow, Earth, Water Race. Although the weather was great Sunday and Monday, Saturday was a damp one and it actually snowed on Tuesday.

How do different colours absorb heat? and What does a barometre measure? were some of the questions students from Myrtle Philip School had to answer in the third annual Science Fair. All children, including kindergarten students, took part in the fair which was designed to give students a chance to use research skills, art talent and writing and speaking abilities together on one area of science in which they show interest. First place winners for each grade include: Grade Seven, “Lasers” by Lisa Morten and Karen Wylie; Grade Six, “Colours and Heat Absorption” by Michelle Rennie and Andrea Wuolle; Grade Five, “Weather Reporting” by Stephanie Fosty; Grade Four, “Guinea Pigs” by Jennifer Croghan and Melanie Busdon; Grade Three, “Eclipses” by Madeline Domries; Grade Two, “Volcanoes” by Briton Liakakos; Grade One, “Monkeys” by Justine Adams, Davey Blaylock, Marco Feller, Casey Greenwood, Aaron Gross, Cory Gudmundson, Yosuke Hamazaki, Jake Humphrey, Mark Jennings and Heather Paul and “Pulleys” by Christopher Systad; Kindergarten, “The Seashore” by James Balfour, Armen Evrensel, Sarah Fennel, Noah Fordham, Christopher Forrest, Moriah Johnston and Tyler Manson.

This Week in Photos: April 26

1980

Jim McConkey displays the McConkey Cup Trophy.

Kris Shoup instructs John Garnet in the school mini-course knitting class while Serap Graf and Monica Niederlich concentrate on the task at hand.

Recently engaged couple Deanna Chan & Graeme O’Neill.

On the Coast Mountain Outdoor School farm site – (L to R) Outdoor Education Coordinator Rick Price, W.L.B. Hawkes of the Ministry of Education, and Pemberton School Trustee T.B.M. (Slim) Fougberg.

A class visiting the Coast Mountain Outdoor School farm learns about chickens.

Johnson’s Trucking gravel crushing plant at work in the Alpha Lake Aggregate pit.

1981

And the winners are: (L to R) Tom Simister, Richard Duryn, Perry Rousseau & Debbie Wood – with the Whistler Cup.

Architect Barclay McLeod and developer Brian Moran indicate to council and concerned Adventures West owners the proposed plans for the ‘Keg property’.

May the Force be with you. Ezekial and His Force rock and reggae it up at the Mountain House until May 2.

Constable Klaudt of Whistler RCMP and Ron Mallinson of Ike’s Towing try to figure out how this Plymouth Horizon ended up in the ditch by the Alta Lake Inn turnoff late on Saturday, April 25!

1982

Survivors of the April blizzards, these crocuses stand proudly in Whistler Village.

Youngsters give it their best during an end-of-season match of Snowball (created by Doug Calder) held at Myrtle Philip School grounds.

Skiers on Whistler enjoyed the sun as much as the runs Sunday.

After a day on the mountain, a little recovery is in order. A siesta helps revive tired muscles.

Sowing so he’ll reap, Resort Municipality of Whistler maintenance man Brian Sandercock prepares the turf for summer.

Two contestants go under the pole during Friday’s Caribbean Night held at L’Apres. Michael Chidley limboed his way to Mexico taking first place in the competition. Val Wong’s style won her first prize in the women’s competition and a heli-skiing trip.

1983

A top-notch mogul basher takes one of the two required air times in his run down Whistler’s Raven run in the Schloss Laderheim Dual Mogul Classic on Sunday, April 24.

A march protesting nuclear weapons makes its way through Vancouver towards Stanley Park.

Anti-nuclear weapons protestors congregate at the rally.

Bill Runge of Whistler Mountain Ski Corp. fastens down the village’s newest signs on Monday reminding ski enthusiasts to keep heading south to the Gondola side of the mountain.

Got the summertime blues of what to wear this season? Not if you were at The Keg’s Fashion Show Sunday, April 24.

1984

The Whistler Question staff pose for a sunny photo in the Whistler Village.

Dr. Peter Oberlander of Vancouver is the lucky winner of a lifetime Whistler/Blackcomb ski pass. The final draw of the Whistler Rotary Club lottery was held Friday afternoon, and proceeds from the sale of tickets go towards the Whistler Health Planning Society. Rotary Club President Geoff Pearce drew the winning ticket.

Picnickers and powder skiers flew to Powder Moutnain Friday for the annual Powder Mountain Heli-Skiing picnic.

While most people brought along only skis and sunglasses, Pascal Tiphine thought to import a little champagne, which he literally splashed into anyone who didn’t ming a few bubbles up their nose.

The surprised look on Drew Meredith’s face was no surprise, considering that 100 people were gathered at the Carleton Lodge Wednesday night to pay tribute to him. Meredith, who thought he was coming to attend a meeting, listened to roasts and toasts throughout the evening, which paid tribute to his work as Interim Director during the toughest year in the history of Whistler Resort Association.

It was an Easter sunrise service without sunshine, but that didn’t stop approximately 80 people from attending the special 7 am service Sunday morning on the shores of Lost Lake. Molly Boyd, playing the organ, led the Whistler Singers who also turned out in full force.

Celebrating Whistler’s World Cup Downhill Races

Historically, in the month of March, Whistler would be hosting a World Cup Downhill event.  Up to 500 weasel workers would be working 12-hour days preparing the racecourse, installing safety nets and removing and moving snow throughout the course.  These volunteers were as important to the success of the event as the downhill racers themselves.

Thousands of ski-race fans would descend on Whistler, filling up hotels and making reservations a necessity to eat at many of the world-class restaurants in Whistler Village.  Pubs and bars would be full to capacity and the village would be enshrouded in a party-like atmosphere for close to two weeks.

Whistler attempted to host its first World Cup race on March 7, 1979.  Due to weather, the race was cancelled.  Three years later, in 1982, Whistler successfully hosted the World Cup Downhill event.  This race took place on a course on the north side of Whistler and its finish was in the newly completed Whistler Village.

Peter Müller of Switzerland finished in first place and two Crazy Canucks, Steve Podborski and Dave Irwin, finished second and third, respectively.  The 1982 race was capped off with a huge celebration because Podborski tied Müller for the overall Downhill World Cup title.

Thousands upon thousands of spectators jam Whistler Village Square for the World Cup presentations.  Whistler Question Collection, 1982.

This would be the only race held on this course.  Racers complained the north side course was too flat and Müller even joked that he should bring his cross-country skis to the next one.  The downhill course was moved back to the south-side course and every other World Cup Downhill race held in Whistler was held on this course.  The racecourse was later renamed after Crazy Canuck Dave Murray, who succumbed to cancer in 1990.

Whistler hosted the World Cup Downhill event again in 1984 and two years later in 1986.  In 1989, Rob Boyd became the first Canadian to win a World Cup race on home soil.  If you ask many Whistlerites here at the time, they can tell you where they were when Boyd crossed the finish line.

Local boy Rob Boyd atop the podium, 25 February 1989. Photo: Greg Griffith/WMAS.

Prior to the Olympic Games hosted in 2010, the last successful Downhill Men’s event was held in 1995.

From 1996 to 1998, the FIS moved the North American stops to earlier in the race season, leading to three consecutive cancellations of the Whistler stop on the World Cup circuit due to snow and weather conditions.

Will Whistler host another World Cup Downhill race?  Or will it be an event that only appears in Whistler’s past?

This Week in Photos: March 29

1980

The view of Creekside for those skiing down Whistler Mountain.

Not quite a parking lot – the view of Whistler Peak for those enjoying the sun at the Roundhouse this spring.

Resort Centre excavation lies gaping in front of packages 3, 4 and 5. This massive crater will be back filled to provide a solid foundation.

The bumps of the Whistler Pro-Am race held March 26.

1981

The Resort Centre gears up for the summer – complete with H. Haebler’s sign on it.

The 90 members of the Squamish Youth Chorale as they performed ‘The Witness’ at the Myrtle Philip School.

A competitor exhibits fine style doing a spread-eagle during the freestyle aerials.

The first pour of the Mountain Inn slabs that was done on March 30.

Stevenson’s Mountain Inn crew takes a break – (from left to right rear) Al Frumento (foreman), Dave Nickerson, Angelo Formolo (foreman), Sisto Marini, Don Shaw, Angelo Seopazzo and Gerhard Klein (superintendent). Seated are Marcel Richoz and Jim Crichton.

Tongue in cheek signs at Garibaldi – Alpine Lodge signs Northbound (l) and Southbound (r).

1982

Ukranian Easter egg dyeing (Psanky) underway at noon hour at the Myrtle Philip School under the direction of Mrs. Epplett.

Bookworms Unite! Take a peek at Ted Nebbeling and Jan Holberg’s new bookstore in Forget-Me-Nots. With a great selection of both classics, best-sellers and magazines, there’s definitely something that will catch your eye.

Tethered to his instructor, this skier practices a hard left turn.

1983

Todd Brooker and Dave Murray take a shot at the Yukon Jack Challenge course.

The waiters’ race (an obstacle course with trays).

Furred and feathered mascots enjoy a little get together.

Up and coming Crazy Canuck Todd Brooker talks skiing with local aficionado Dave Roberts while John (J.C.) Colpitts sizes up the champ’s feet for Super Feet foot beds at The Downhill Shop on Thursday, March 24 during Brooker’s ski vacation here.

Anthony Brummet, BC’s Minister of Lands, Parks & Housing announced March 25 that $9 million will be made available to complete Whistler Village Facilities.

Ross Dinwoodie, a lineman with the Squamish office of BC Hydro shows Myrtle Philip School children how to avoid some shocking experiences during a demonstration last Wednesday.

Const. Rene Defosse, the newest addition to Whistler’s RCMP detachment gets ready for his line of duty in this resort town. Const. Defuse replaces Const. Gadabout who was transferred to Ottawa.

1984

Spring brings the rehabilitation of the Whistler Golf Course to prepare for the seasons ahead.

Bev Wylie shows off the new equipment in the medical clinic.

Keeping the roads clearly marked requires signs and stencils.

This Week In Photos: March 8

One of the best part of the Whistler Question Collection is that it shows different sides of Whistler as a developing resort, including skiing, contests, parties, school events, construction and scenes of everyday life.

1979

Toni Sailer runs the Molson World Cup Downhill course on Tuesday.

Toni Sailer and Nancy Greene-Raine on the World Cup Downhill course.

A Beetle is carted out of Creekside.

One of the Tantalus Creations seamstresses at work on a vest, part of a line of custom ski wear.

1980

Construction continues in Whistler Village despite the snow on the ground.

The new Public Service building has its finishing touches added and new cells installed, currently unoccupied.

Myrtle Philip pays a visit to a class at Myrtle Philip School, sharing photos and tales of her early days in the valley.

‘Downhill’ Bill Gregory leads a group of cross country skiers down the water town hill in the Fischer Cup.

Myrtle Philip teachers & parents prepare the climbing apparatus for the PE workshop on March 8.

1981

The lineup at the bottom of Whistler Mountain looks like it could use a little more snow, or any snow at all.

It’s not the usual slalom course you see in Whistler, but that didn’t stop this group of kayakers.

The crowd gets out onto the dance floor at Club 10.

Mayor Pat Carleton (centre) congratulates Michel Segur (left) and Jean-Jacques Aaron on the opening of their new club.

How many people can you fit in one hot tub? Looks like we’re going to find out.

1982

Guide Mike Jackobson heads the pack as the powder skiers make tracks on an open slope near Bralorne.

All that remained of the lower portion of the Blackcomb skiers bridge that collapsed Saturday, March 6 injuring two.

Action! Fitness instructor Sue Worden pedals her heart out for Action BC testing Saturday, March 6 while Kevin Ponnock, fitness consultant, records pulse rate. The government-sponsored program includes flexibility training and a diet analysis so that participants can asses their fitness level.

Don Armour (seated) and Peter Zandon give the new WRA computer system a workout. The computer is a major step towards co-ordinating reservations throughout Whistler.

1983

A new sound wafted through the air of Whistler Village Saturday, March 5 thanks to Otto Baumann and his Alp horn. The horns were originally designed to call cattle home or signal nearby neighbours. Baumann, 25, a native of Lucern Switzerland, made this horn himself. It measures 12 feet in length.

At it again! Blackcomb and Whistler Mountain staff squared off for the second round (actually there’s been far more than two rounds guzzled in this competition) of their boat races.

Doc Fingers and the Gortex Blues Band kept the crowd on their feet at the Canadian Telemark Team Benefit, Sunday March 6 at Bullets Cabaret. (L-R) Robin Ferrier, Doc Fingers and Jack Levin belt it out for the full house. Not shown is Ferrier’s crutch – supporting his ankle, broken March 4 scant days before the telemark racing season really gets underway.

Foot in the Door titillates the telemarkers at the Canadian Telemark Team Benefit held at Bullets Cabaret Sunday. (L-R) Mark Schnaidt, Craig Barker, Charlie Doyle and Rocco Bonito helped the team net $500 toward sending the team to races in Colorado.

M. Robert Gourdin, North American sales rep for Moet et Chandon and Hennessy Cognac, topped off this $24,000 tower of Baccaret crystal glasses with a few bottles of bubbly during a special presentation at Delta Mountain Inn March 3. And how to open a bottle of champagne on such a special occasion? Why, with a Napoleonic sabre, of course.

1984

A typewriter graveyard? No, these are just a small part of the many tons of equipment, from pencils to lasers, being used for Molson World Downhill coordination.

It was a tough choice for judges at Saturday’s air band contest. The contest, held at Stumps in conjunction with the Volvo Ski Show, featured four bands. The Energy Pals, a duo, eventually won and took home two pairs of Blizzard skis. In second place were The Superbs followed by the five-member Culture Club.