Tag Archives: transportation

LEGO Competition 2017 Recap

Last Saturday the Whistler Museum was happy to welcome 41 children for our 21st annual LEGO Building Competition. Because of the smoke in the valley, we had to bring the kids inside to build their creations. This didn’t seem to dampen anyone’s sprits or creativity!

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The kids in the 9-11 age group begin to build their LEGO transportation creations.

After a short presentation and introduction, the kids were given 45 minutes to build their best interpretation of the theme. This year’s theme was “Imagination Transportation”, to showcase how much transportation has changed in the past 100 years of Whistler. The children were asked to build anything to represent their ideal form of transportation, real or imaginary. We had some really inventive interpretations of the theme, including spaceships, a hover-board, and an impressive black submarine from a talented 8 year old.

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A colourful flying car built by a 6 year old named Peter.

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Gregory’s jet engine and Marie’s hover-board powered by rockets, both from the 9-11 age category.

 

We would really like to thank our judges Alison Hunter, Marie Holland from the Audain Museum, Julie Burrows from the Whistler Public Library, and Alyssa Bruijns from the Whistler Museum and Archives. We wouldn’t be able to hold the competition without your support! The winners they decided on this year were as follows:

Ages 5 and under:

  1. Michael M.
  2. Asher
  3. Cam H.

Ages 6-8:

  1. Isaac P.
  2. Ethan A.
  3. Joey J.

Ages 9-11:

  1. William O.
  2. Zachary D.
  3. Bronwyn D.

Ages 12 and up:

  1. Samuel L.
  2. Linus K.
  3. Dylan P.
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A little boy from the under five age group with his impressive DUPLO train adorned with a polar bear!

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The kids in the 12 and up table share their LEGO with a boy from a younger group.

 

 

Even if a child didn’t win a prize, they still went home with a loot bag fun of fun goodies.

This event wouldn’t be possible if it wasn’t for the support we receive every year from our generous local businesses. This year we received donations from Armchair Books, Cows Ice Cream, Escape! Whistler, IGA, Meadow Park Sports Centre, PureBread, The Great Glass Elevator, Avalanche Pizza, The Old Spaghetti Factory, and Whoola Toys.

We would also like to give a huge thank you to every child and parent or caretaker that was involved in the LEGO Competition. We love to see everyone come out to have fun, and despite the relocation it was a success. See you next year!

 

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2017 LEGO Building Competition

The competition is sold out for this year! This year marks the 21st annual Building Competition with LEGO bricks. It is open for children under 15 and there are many great prizes to be won! Children are given 45 minutes to create something in their best interpretation of the theme. This year’s theme is “Imagination Transportation”, to showcase how much transportation has changed in the 150 years since Canada’s Confederation. After the time is up, our judges will choose the top three children from each age group to win special prizes. You don’t worry about winning, because every child will walk away with a goody bag full of fun stuff!

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Transportation has always been a crucial factor in history, affecting who visits a place, who stays, and how people live. Every major period in Whistler’s history developed alongside changes to Whistler’s links with the outside world. 150 years ago, the only way to get to Whistler was through the Pemberton Trail, which was winding and dangerous. When pioneers first began making the trek to the valley, about 100 years ago, it took three days. The first day would be spend on a steamboat from Vancouver to Squamish, followed by a three day journey on foot to get to Whistler. After that came the train, and since then cars, bikes, water-planes and many other methods of transportation have made their way into the valley. This year’s theme, therefore, is going to showcase transportation! Old or new, real or imaginary, show us what you think would be the best way to get around. Maybe you think everyone should do as they did back in 1914 and take the train everywhere they go. Otherwise, maybe in your fantasy world, the streets are filled with snow and everyone gets along with skis and snowboards. From horses to spaceships, or even to riding lions, let your imagination run wild!

This year the event will be taking place on August 5th in Florence Petersen Park from 2pm-4pm. 

It is $10 per child, to register please call us at 604-932-2019 or email our Program Coordinator at programcoord@whistlermuseum.org.

We have great prizes from Armchair books, Cows, Escape!, The Great Glass Elevator, and Meadow Park Sports Centre, just to name a few. 

Speaker Series: Three Decades On The Duffey

*** SOLD OUT ***

Failure planes, depth hoar, induction lines, Rutschblocks. Even if you have no idea what we’re talking about, you probably know that avalanche safety is an extremely important topic in B.C. and other mountain regions around the world. Avalanche science has come a long way over the last three decades, and Scott Aitken has seen it all.

Scott in front of some Gazex avalanche detonator above the Duffey.

Scott is entering his 29th season as an avalanche technician for the B.C. Ministry of Transportation & Infrastructure’s Coast-Chilcotin section. The man is personally responsible for keeping our region’s roads safe from snow slides, including the renowned ski terrain above the notorious Duffey Lake Highway. You can bet he’s accumulated his share of stories over the years.

For a quick video tease of Scott working in the field, check this short clip “Avalanche Road” from photo/video magician Jordan Manley, profiling avalanche crews around the province (Scott and partner Doug Tuck appear about 1:35 in):

This Wednesday evening Scott will be coming into the Whistler Museum to kick off our winter Speaker Series with a presentation  entitled “Avalanche Forecasting: A Thirty Year Retrospective.” The start of another glorious, snow-filled winter is the perfect time for a snow-safety refresher, but don’t come expecting a dull crystallography lecture (though I’m sure he’ll be happy to answer any technical questions).

Fairly typical work conditions for an Avy Tech.

Instead, Scott will offer a unique first-hand account of the life of a professional avalanche technician. These folks work pretty darn hard to keep our roads and surrounding mountains safe, but go completely unnoticed when they’re doing their jobs best. Wednesday’s presentation will provide you with a behind-the-scenes look into these unheralded efforts and broaden your perspective on the huge advancements in avalanche safety over the years.

Where: Whistler Museum (4333 Main Street, behind the Library)
When: Wednesday November 21st, Doors 6:15pm, Presentation 7pm
Tickets: 7$/$5 for Museum members. Advance tickets at museum or call 604-932-2019
Other: Cash Bar (19+), complimentary tea & coffee.

Stay tuned for announcements about upcoming Speaker Series events, to occur on the 3rd Wednesday of each month, January through April.