Tag Archives: Whistler Answers

Whistler’s Answers: June 17, 1982

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1982.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: Summers in the early 1980s were not exactly busy – some businesses even closed for the season – though there were some efforts to draw visitors to the area. The Whistler Golf Course, which had begun as a 9-hole course (learn more about that here), was being expanded in the summer of 1982 with hopes that it would drive more summer visitors to Whistler.

Question: How valuable an asset do you think the golf course will be to Whistler?

Robin Crumley – Manager, Whistler Village Inn – Alpine Meadows – Occasional Golfer

It’s indispensable. It Whistler is to become a summer resort, not only is the golf course indispensable, but all the other attractions necessary for a summer resort are indispensable as well. You can’t have a resort in a vacuum.

Since skiing is the main attraction, people who come here are already sports-oriented. It’s much better to extend the market you already have into the summer months.

John Carter – Manager, Tantalus Lodge – Tantalus Lodge – Occasional Golfer

It’s a good selling point. But the economics of it are questionable because of the limited number of people who can actually play in one day.

About 300 people a day can play, and there’s about 4000 commercial beds in this valley.

I think tennis courts are a much more valuable asset. They’re cheaper to build, cheaper to maintain and surveys show that they’re used more than golf courses.

Diane Eby – Past President of Whistler Ratepayers Association – Emerald Estates – Non-golfer

I think it’s an absolute necessity as a summer attraction for tourists.

My only concern is that is not become a horrendous burden to the local taxpayer, and I’d like to see some answers from Council on how this will be avoided.

$89,000 is slated for the golf course this year. What will it be next year?

Jim Kennedy – Labourer – Westside Rode – Occasional Golfer

I think it’s going to be a liability as opposed to an asset.

There’s only so many people who can shoot a round of golf in a day – not like skiing which can accommodate 10,000 people a day.

I’d also be surprised if it will be reasonably priced for local people to play a round of golf. It’s going to take a lot of money just to maintain it.

Pascal Simon – Roofer – Alpine Meadows – Non-golfer

I would say any improvement, such as a development like this, would be an asset to the tourists and the locals. It has to be worth it – we’re going to pay for it after all.

Harry Carman – Unemployed – Adventures West – Golfer

I think it will make the difference between this community making or breaking it.

It will help bring conventions in, providing they get the other facilities set up as well.

I’m sure it will attract more people in the summer months which will help all the businesses.

I’m real anxious for them to finish it. Needless to say, I’m a player.

Whistler’s Answers: June 10, 1982

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1982.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: A major recession hit North America in late 1981, with interest rates reaching up to 20%. Employment and construction projects were uncertain for many.

Question: What do you think the chances are for a province-wide strike in the construction industry this summer?

*editor’s note: the following men interviewed are all union members

Ken White – Plastering Contractor – Vancouver

The boys are going to vote for a strike and the contractors are going to turn around and lock them out just to show them they still have the power.

No way contractors want to pay out that kind of money. The workers are asking for $7.50 an hour more over the next year.

Bricklayers, electricians, plumbers – I drink beer with them every weekend and they have the same opinion.

Bob Wyer – Plumber – North Vancouver

I honestly don’t think anyone knows. The only reason why they’re taking a strike vote is so they can use it as leverage.

They want to be able to go to the contractors’ association and say, look, we have so many men here who want to go on strike.

What you hear through bar-talk and the grapevine is that there’s a good possibility of a month-long strike.

But who knows for sure? They haven’t even made us an offer yet.

Monte Sandvoss – Project Manager – Vancouver

I think there’s going to be a strike. Working (union) members don’t see reality.

They’re working and look at the economy and it doesn’t mean anything. They think they have good reason to strike. They don’t care – they’re on the gravy train.

I was disappointed when I talked to quite a few of them and found out they wanted to strike.

Bill Agler – Hod Carrier – Vancouver

I don’t think there will be a strike. Everybody I talk to doesn’t want to strike, but then I’m talking to working guys.

It really is hard to say for sure, but as far as I can gather there probably won’t be one since a little more than half the union men are working right now and they don’t want to give that up.

Ben Vos – Labour Foreman

I don’t think it will happen. They might vote in favour of a strike, but that doesn’t necessarily mean they’ll go on strike.

What is does give them is a mandate at the bargaining table.

But I’m doubtful they’ll even get a strike vote. If they do, the contractors might just lock them out.

Al White – Hod Carrier – Vancouver

A lot of guys are out of work now or on unemployment insurance and they’re going to vote for a strike because it won’t make much difference to them.

It’s the ones who are working who would be hurt by a strike, and I’d say they’re in the majority.

It will be a close vote, but I think it probably won’t happen.

Whistler’s Answers: June 3, 1982

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1982.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: In 1982, as Whistler looked to expand its summer businesses, the municipality was in the process of creating a five-year plan for Lost Lake and the surrounding area. This plan included clearing the beach area, upgrading the trail system, and creating picnic facilities. While there was support for clearing the beach, the idea of a permanent concession facility that could include food, beverages, and boat rentals was under debate.

Question: How do you feel about the proposed concession stand for Lost Lake?

Sloane Hansen – Student – White Gold Estates

I don’t like the idea. Lost Lake used to be a retreat. If people want a place that’s all commercialized, they should go to Alice Lake.

Fixing up the beach is okay, but I don’t want to see this place like a resort.

They might as well change the name – it’s Found Lake now.

Patrice Couture – Construction Worker – Alpine Meadows

For this lake it won’t be a good thing. It will bring too many people.

It’s all right to be able to buy a pop, but I’m not sure about boat rentals.

Basically I’d rather not have a concession – I’d rather have it quiet.

Mike Petrus – Waiter – White Gold Estates

I could maybe see a concession stand for food and drink, but I wouldn’t agree with canoe and paddleboat rentals. It’s such a small lake.

If they’re going to fix up the beach – okay. But there shouldn’t be any boats.

People – and garbage – will be all over the place.

I think a concession would spoil it, like what’s happened in so many other places.

Jimmy Wharin – Doorman – Whistler Vale

It’s great for a summer attraction as long as they sell beer.

Al Davis – Artist – Function Junction

I think it’s long overdue. Lost Lake is already lost so you might as well have a concession.

Pierre Trudeau – Contractor – Alpine Meadows

It’s the s—!

Whistler’s Answers: May 27, 1982

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1982.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: Summers in the early 1980s were not exactly busy – some businesses even closed for the season – though there were some efforts to draw visitors to the area. The Chamber of Commerce began organizing May Day Madness, a series of events over the May long weekend for both visitors and residents. Another event over the weekend was the Great Snow Earth Water Race, which ran for over 15 years.

Question: As all the festivities wind to a halt, what did you think was the highlight of the May Day Madness weekend?

Nigel Woods – Chief Goat – Alpine Meadows

Generally the nice atmosphere that prevailed. There was a real team spirit, both individually and in a group sense. It was a much more mellow weekend than previous years, which I think shows the maturity of the town.

P.J. Paterson – Sales Rep – Alpine Meadows

The dance on Saturday was the best. There was a good band, good dancing and lots of crazy people.

Karen Wylie – Full-time Kid – Alpine Meadows

The Great Snow Earth Water Race was my favourite. It was so exciting – especially the canoeing. They were falling all over the place – falling out of the canoes, falling in the water. One canoe even sank.

Satia – Full-time Pet – Alpine Meadows

All the exotic, uptown dogs that were around for the weekend.

Terry Rodgers – Alderman – White Gold Estates

The turnout.

Dave Sorenson – Unemployed Carpenter – Nesters

The wine, the women and the songs.