Tag Archives: Whistler Answers

Whistler’s Answers: November 10, 1983

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1983.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: After the election of Bill Bennett and a Social Credit government in 1983, Bennett’s party introduced a series of bills that quickly became controversial. Of particular concern to the BC Government Employees Union (BCGEU) were Bill 2, which limited the rights of workers and unions in the public sector to negotiate terms except for wages and benefits, and Bill 3, which gave public sector authorities the power to terminate workers without cause and regardless of seniority. Despite organized opposition to these moves (including an estimated 80,000 person demonstration in Vancouver), these and other bills were passed. At midnight on October 31, 1983, about 40,000 members of the BCGEU went on strike, demanding the government retract Bill 2 and provide an exemption from Bill 3.

Question: How has the BC Government Employees Union strike affected you?

Donna Liakakos – Village Store Manager – Alpine Meadows

If the schools go out everyone with children will be affected. I don’t care about the liquor store, but there could be trouble if road conditions worsen. In Vancouver there’s more awareness about the strike than here because more jobs are affected.

John Ryan – Store Security Worker – Vancouver

Not apart from the liquor store, although if the buses go it’ll be a hassle to go to work. People get laid off all the time but when it happens to big unions they act differently. It seems kind of quiet here – we’ve seen a few pickets, and the exercise class is cancelled.

Joe Bowman – Waiter – Pemberton

Not at all. I’ve seen some pickets. They (strikers) should have done it 10 years ago: shut it down and take a better look at it. It’s got to be done now. The thing to do is to provide jobs. The government has been hired as managers; if we don’t have tenure they shouldn’t either.

Whistler’s Answers: November 3, 1983

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1983.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: The Alta Lake Sports Club (ALSC) began building cross-country ski trails in the Whistler valley, specifically around Lost Lake, in the 1970s. The ALSC groomed the trails and, for the first years, they were available for free to anyone with skis. In the early 1980s, when the municipality held a referendum on the development of parks and trails in the valley, it was widely understood that the maintenance would be paid for through taxes. The municipality proposed charging cross-country skiers to access the trails at Lost Lake Park in 1983, causing controversy within Whistler as some residents felt it was one of the only free activities available in the winter, the facilities at Lost Lake Park didn’t warrant a $2 fee, and the ALSC had previously been able to afford to provide the maintenance for free.

Question: Is Council justified in charging cross-country skiers to use Lost Lake Park?

Les Doyle – Unemployed – Brio

I think it’s ridiculous. The trails should be a service to the community. I know a few people who come just to cross-country ski and it’ll turn them off. If it’s a public park you can’t really charge to get in.

Cathy Greenwood – Hotel Office Manager – Whistler Cay

Yes. It’s costing us taxpayers money, not the government. I don’t think people will object to it. Back east they have to pay for cross-country. It’s not like they’re charging $10.

Samuel P. Umpkin – Sci-fi Novelist – Tapley’s Farm

I think it’s a seedy thing to do. I haven’t skied myself since my accident, but I can see that concerns will be voiced that a public park should be a free public park. They may as well charge for… pumpkins, for example.

Whistler’s Answers: October 27, 1983

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1983.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: A public meeting was planned for October 31, 1983 to discuss a proposal by Stoney’s Restaurant to extend the lounge out under the existing covered walkway and to move the walkway over the planters. Stoney’s, which is the current location of La Bocca, wanted to increase the capacity of their lounge from 22 seats to 65 seats by moving their south wall towards the edge of the walkway. Municipal planners were concerned that this act would create a precedent for other village sites. Design guidelines specified that developers must provide covered walkways within their own property and Stoney’s plans would extend the covered walkway onto property owned by Whistler Land Co. Developments.

Question: Should Stoney’s be allowed to expand its lounge?

Kent Thornton – Bartender – Whistler Village

If there’s room I don’t see why not. I don’t think a precedent will affect the other places in the village. If one store wanted to expand, all the other places in that area would have to be moved out as well.

Veena Goodin – Unemployed – Vancouver

Well, my feeling is yes, if there’s a need. Not to let it happen wouldn’t be quite right. Let it happen, and deal with any problems when they arise. You shouldn’t want to stop progress, that’s very important.

Jim Gravel – Hotel Employee – White Gold

It would be okay for Stoney’s, but everyone else will want to do the same. Every case should be dealt with on its own. With Stoney’s not too many people walk through there in the spring as it is.

Whistler’s Answers: October 20, 1983

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1983.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: When construction began on the Whistler Convention Centre, plans included a swimming pool, an ice rink, saunas, racquetball and squash courts, a restaurant and more. By 1983, when it had been taken over by the Crown corporation Whistler Land Co. Developments and redesigned under Chester Johnson, most of the extra facilities had been eliminated. Find out more about the early plans for the building here.

Question: Is the new Whistler Convention Centre design adequate?

Doug Greenwood – Hotel Manager – Whistler Cay

From the beginning the centre was designed wrong. It should be just a convention centre. It would be nice to have an ice rink, but that wouldn’t stimulate jobs. I don’t understand why it can’t be ready sooner (before April ’85). There’s men available and 24 hours in a day.

Ron McCready – Restaurant Manager – Whistler

I think it’s great. The vast majority of people at the meeting were pleased. My only disappointment is that the convention centre won’t be open in time for next winter. The design is great, it’s exactly what’s needed.

Laurie Vance – Hotel Employee – Alpine Meadows

I think it’s wonderful I’m sorry they’re not putting in a swimming pool, that would have been nice. But it wouldn’t help Whistler if everyone complained about it. The time frame is as fast as they can do it.