Tag Archives: Whistler Museum

Whistler’s Answers: July 8, 1982

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1982.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: A major recession hit North America in late 1981, with interest rates reaching up to 20%. Due to changes in the way school tax was calculated, increased road maintenance costs, and higher interest rates, property taxes in Whistler jumped 25% in 1982.

Question: How did you feel about paying your property taxes this year?

Bob Ellis – Businessman – Alpine Meadows property

We have a condo. That’s probably why my property taxes weren’t as bad as I expected.

With the homeowner’s grant, the taxes really weren’t too bad.

But I can see why some people who own houses are gasping.

Inge Nielsen – Gift Shop Operator – Commercial and Whistler Cay Heights property

I think it’s outrageous, I really do. What upsets me the most are the school taxes. Why do we have to support the entire school district?

We have one small school, and the facilities there certainly aren’t up to the level of taxes we’re paying.

Ken Hardy – Contractor – Brio property

I paid my taxes reluctantly. I feel the taxes are far too high for the product we’re receiving, particularly school taxes.

One thing that really piqued me was the $89,000 in the budget for golf course maintenance. How can you maintain something which isn’t even built yet?

Jan Simpson – Real Estate Agent – Alta Vista property

I didn’t pay them this year, and I haven’t paid them for two years. I get so many parking tickets and dog fines, I can’t afford to pay taxes.

The real problem is that school taxes, and the level of services we get, are way out of line compared to Vancouver.

Morley Forsyth – Advertising Sales – Gondola Area property

I feel taxes are very expensive for recreational property. I pay less in Vancouver and I get a lot more for my money.

I think the residents here should get together and protest.

Judy Waddingham – Travel Consultant – Whistler Cay property

I didn’t feel anything because I haven’t paid them yet.

Last year’s taxes were shocking – this year’s taxes are devastating.

A Disco Comes to Whistler

For decades, many of Whistler’s businesses, including late-night establishments, have been concentrated within the Village. The first nightclub (or, as it was called at the time, disco) to open in the Village was Club 10 forty years ago.

Club 10 opened beneath Stoney’s on Friday, March 6, 1981 in the space most recently occupied by Maxx Fish. The venture was a new one for the owners, Michel Segur and Jean-Jacques Aaron, both of whom operated restaurants in the Lower Mainland (Segur’s Chez Michel continues to operate in West Vancouver today). Club 10 offered music, dancing, some limited food such as cheese plates and quiches, and drinks in Whistler’s “normal, pricy range,” and, by all accounts, was an almost instant success.

The crowd gets out onto the dance floor at Club 10. Whistler Question Collection, 1981.

As Club 10 was described as Whistler’s first “real disco,” it’s no surprise that the owners invested in their sound equipment and design, though it appears their aim was not to deafen their patrons. Guy O’Hazza, who installed the club’s sound system, said that, “The sound was not made to be loud, it was made to be clean. It’s directed at the dance floor, so you can still sit at a table and talk.” The system was installed with the capacity to use turntables, but at the time of Club 10’s opening the music relied entirely on cassette tapes. The music itself was varied, ranging from New Wave to swing to country and more.

Mayor Pat Carleton (centre) congratulates Michel Segur (left) and Jean-Jacques Aaron on the opening of their new club. Whistler Question Collection, 1981.

The interior of Club 10 was designed by Gilbert Konqui, who had also designed Stoney’s and, later that year, would design the interior of The Longhorn. According to Konqui, the design was “ultra modern mixed with funk,” a combination of “funky, fun and relaxed.” From the ceiling hung a combination of art nouveau lights and disco balls, reflecting red and blue lights throughout the space. Decorations included two plaster angels, an eagle above the bar, a wall of books, and a large image of Humphrey Bogart.

The only part of Club 10’s opening that was not a success was the entrance, which was described by the Whistler Question as “a bit disconcerting” and reminiscent of a “somewhat sterile” entry to a warehouse. This problem was quickly solved by hiring Raymond Clements, and artist from Horseshoe Bay, to paint a mural in the stairwell. After three days, the plan walls were covered by mountains, chairlifts, ferries, and palm trees.

The walls of the entrance to Club 10, decorated by Ray Clements. Whistler Question Collection, 1981.

Through the 1980s, Club 10 hosted themed parties, fashion shows, and more before being sold, rebought, and then sold to Mitch Garfinkel in 1990. Garfinkel, an attorney from Florida, had plans to open similar bars in various ski resorts under the same name, Garfinkel’s Club 10’s space was redone, replacing painted walls with wood panelling, updating the sound system to play compact discs, and adding a large bar with a fish tank in the centre. In June 1990 Garfinkel’s was ready to open to the public, complete with its logo featuring a moose holding a draft beer.

Garfinkel’s operated for nine years before locating to its current location in 1999. Though the business occupying the space may have changed, its purpose has been the same since it first opened as Club 10 four decades ago.

Summer Programs 2021

Valley of Dreams Walking Tour

On the Whistler Museum’s Valley of Dreams Walking Tour, you’ll uncover the history of Alta Lake’s fishing resorts, tales behind the mountain development on Whistler and Blackcomb Mountains, and stories behind Whistler’s journey to the 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games. The tour is approximately one hour long and is for all ages. Walking Tours begin at 11 am daily in July, August & September. Meeting outside the Visitor Information Centre on Gateway Dr., these tours are offered by donation. Tour are limited to 10 participants.

Discover Nature at Lost Lake Park

This “pop up” museum explores Whistler’s unique natural history and includes visual displays& and on-site interpreters. Different themes and aspects of Whistler’s natural history are rotated and explored daily. Mondays through Fridays in July and August. 11 am – 5 pm.

*We plan to have “no touch” tables again this year, but will be focusing on visual interpretation

Crafts in the Park

Crafts in the Park is going virtual again this summer! The Whistler Museum and the Whistler Public Library are teaming up to present Crafts FROM the Park, offering a different craft every week from July 15 to August 26. Each Thursday we will share a video filmed in Florence Petersen Park to share a little about Whistler’s history and lead you through a craft project. You’ll find the video on our Facebook page and on our website here. Families can sign up to receive weekly craft supply packages (sign up here) and we will also share the craft supply list for each week Please note that these crafts may require some parental assistance.

Nature Walking Tour (Video Guided)

Our guided nature walking tours will be offered digitally this year! This online tour corresponds with numbered, designated locations along the Nature Trail that starts at Lost Lake PassivHaus and includes video and images related to Whistler’s rich natural history. Find more information here.

Whistler’s Answers: July 1, 1982

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1982.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: The Whistler Village Land Company, a subsidiary of the Resort Municipality of Whistler, was formed in 1978 to oversee the development of the Town Centre.

Question: How do you view the current role of the Land Company in the development of Whistler?

W. Doug Fox – Vice-President of Finance & Operations – Whistler Village Land Co.

It’s very simple – our role is to develop the remaining private sites in the village in conjunction with the private sector. That always has been the role and still it.

The main role of the Land Company is not promoting and marketing. The specific role is developing sites for sale to the private sector. We don’t have anything if we don’t have the sites.

Mike Vance – Coordinator of Planning and Design – Whistler Village Land Co.

Ideally, if economic conditions were better, the Land Company would remain involved in planning, design and servicing of Whistler Village throughout the completion of the project.

But under present conditions, the Land Company can’t stay as involved as it has been in the past in planning and design coordination.

A lot of operation of the village – planning and design – will now have to be assumed by the municipality.

David O’Keefe – Skier Services and North Side Coordinator – Whistler Mountain Ski Corp.

Originally it was a coordinating body to market and sell the land available in the new Town Centre.

Right now it should positively continue along that line. Unfortunately we’re in a time of buyer restraint, but that doesn’t mean we should stop the whole thing.

The mandate has been set, and since times are more difficult the Land Company should be going even further afield to market land sites.

Greg Griffith – Photographer – Owner of Mountain Moments

It should be a decreasing role in the future. Municipal staff and our elected officials should now be the ones making the types of decisions the Land Company has been handling.

I think it’s great the Land Company got things going, but now they should be winding down gracefully since the Town Centre is rapidly approaching fulfillment of its initial mandate.

Sid Young – Alderman – Land Company Director – Travel Agent

I don’t see it as any different than it ever has been.

Although, because of the level of development which has occurred to date, I do see the possibility of reducing the size of the Land Company and therefore its operational costs.

Al Raine – Executive Director – Whistler Resort Association

The reality is that is number one objective must be its own survival.

Its number two objective should be the completion of Village Stroll and the main village core, as well as the Sports & Convention Centre.

Ideally, it also should be looking at a leadership role in terms of providing tourist services and a tourist product.