Tag Archives: Whistler Question

Whistler’s Answers: September 16, 1982

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1982.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: The Mountain Development Corporation was an initiative to provide affordable housing for Whistler residents through the development of Tapley’s Farm. Shareholders became the first owners in the neighbourhood and in December 1980 lots were drawn at a large party. Restrictions were put on the lots, including that all homes had to have a covenant restricting ownership to Whistler employees and that the Resort Municipality of Whistler had a right of first refusal on any subsequent sale of lots. When some lots were sold during the recession of the early 1980s, the RMOW passed on their right of first refusal and the covenants on such lots were removed. This meant that lots that had been passed on could be sold at market prices, rather than a formula price.

Question: Do you think MDC owners should be able to sell their lots at other than formula price?

Don Gamache – MDC lot owner

I’ve been thinking about that lately. Yes, I think the owners should be able to sell their lots at any price, but I don’t want to see a bunch of open property dropped on the market just to turn over a dollar. The lot should be developed and maybe owned for a couple of years before it’s sold.

Mike Culwell – interested bystander

No, I think the system was set up a certain way which everyone agreed to at the time so they should stick to it. Nine tenths of the people I know will scream at me for saying this but they knew the rules when MDC was started.

Roland Kentel – ex waiting list member

The answer to that is simple. Yes. There’s nothing to expand on. It’s a legal contract. The municipality refused when they had right of first refusal so owners are free to sell their lots on the open market.

Whistler’s Answers: September 9, 1982

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1982.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: When Eldon Beck designed the Whistler Village, he intended for people to get a little lost. In 1982, however, some people were having a bit more trouble than expected. The Village was still under construction, subdivisions weren’t always clearly marked, and there weren’t all that many maps around for those finding their way. Even the signs on the highway were less direct than they are today.

Question: Have you had any problems finding your way around Whistler?

Karin Strom-Gundersen – Vancouver

I think everything seems to be fairly straightforward. There’s definitely adequate signage.

Last time we were here we went cross-country skiing and had no problems.

The only thing we didn’t realize and it might confuse other people – is that there’s two parts to Whistler: the old section down by the Husky and the new centre here.

Carolyn Henshaw – Delta, BC

None!

Axel Andkide – Essex, Ontario

It’s been fairly easy getting around. I would say we had no problems whatsoever.

This is the first time we’ve come here. We drove up from Horseshoe Bay and there was no problem in finding the place or finding our way around.

We’ve really enjoyed it.

Whistler’s Answers: September 2, 1982

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1982.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: On Sunday, August 29, Whistler held its first marathon. 131 participants (113 in the half marathon and 18 in the full marathon) circled the Whistler valley and, from all reports, the community played a huge role in sponsoring the event, volunteering, and cheering on the runners.

Question: What did you think of Whistler’s first marathon?

Nancy Power – Volunteer – Alpine Meadows

I thought the race organizers did a terrific job. The comments I heard from runners about marshalling and the aid stations were very positive.

One friend of mine who entered the marathon said he was almost ready to give up after the first lap, but when he came through the village and heard the music and all the audience cheering him on, he just couldn’t quit.

The only negative criticism I heard was that all the runners didn’t get T-shirts.

Murray Coates – Marathon runner – Emerald Estates

To say it was good would be an understatement. Everybody – the spectators, organizers, volunteers and runners – put all they had into it. It was mind-boggling how great it was.

It may be one of the most difficult courses in the world. The back stretch on Westside Road was really tough. Any runner that finished it was a winner.

Two things stand out in my mind – it was great to be able to run on home turf and I really liked the idea of increasing participation by holding a half marathon.

Bob Goulet – Spectator – White Gold Estates

I thought it was really great. The endurance and strength the athletes displayed was amazing. To run from the village, along Westside Road and then back again in about an hour is amazing – and that’s what the first three or four runners did.

It would be really good to see another race next year – it’s a good think to get some of the locals in shape.

Whistler’s Answers: August 26, 1982

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1982.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: The idea of a municipal airport was under discussion for much of the early 1980s, with various locations proposed. These locations included the Callaghan Valley and, most prominently in 1982, an area at the south end of Green Lake just west of the Mons overpass. As of today, Whistler does not have a tri-service airport facility; float planes are able to take off and land on Green Lake, and the nearest airport is in Pemberton.

Question: Do you think it’s necessary to have a tri-service airport facility at Whistler? If so, where should it be located?

Diane Eby – Airplane owner and former president of Whistler Ratepayers Association – Emerald Estates

Personally, I don’t see the absolute need for a tri-service facility, but then I’m not living down in the Gondola area with helicopters taking off all the time.

As for the location, I can’t see it at the Mons site the airport committee is now discussing. It’s very close to a residential area and there’s three big Hydro lines right there.

Eighty percent of the time the weather in Whistler isn’t suitable for flying anyways. It seems like we’re wasting a lot of taxpayer’s money when there’s already a facility 18 miles down the road in Pemberton.

Mike Jakobbson – Electrical contractor – Alpine Meadows

Sure, it would be handy to have a facility like that here. The point is, where are you going to put it?

I can’t see anywhere in Whistler where you could have it. The closest place is Pemberton.

It would be a definite asset to be able to bring in direct flights from Vancouver, but something like that is definitely in the future.

Are taxpayers going to pay for this? That’s another point. There’s enough burden on taxpayers right now without spending more money.

Mark Angus – Alderman, Chairman of the Airport Committee – Gondola Area

Yes, for safety reasons. We need to try and keep float planes off Alta Lake, which is more heavily used (than Green Lake) by windsurfers and swimmers.

We need to try and keep choppers out of populated areas, like the Gondola area and the Blackcomb benchlands which someday will be a residential/commercial area.

The Mons area is one site where we can put all three services in one spot.

If we were to build a small landing spot here – I hate to call it an airport – the spinoff in money would be good for the valley as a whole.