Tag Archives: Whistler Question

Whistler’s Answers: August 19, 1982

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1982.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: The first Fall Festival in Whistler was organized by the Whistler Resort Association in September 1981. It featured various performances, contests and events and raised money for local causes such as the Alta Lake Sports Club and the Whistler Health Care Society. Find out more about the Fall Festival here.

Question: What was missing from the Fall Festival last year that you would like to see this year?

Brian Alsop – Whistler Mtn. Ski Corp. Employee – Alta Vista

I think Whistler is skiing-oriented – and because of that, Blackcomb and Whistler Mountain should put more into their displays than last year. There really wasn’t much to them.

With all the crowds up here, let’s sell skiing – let’s sell the only commodity we have to sell.

We could have a season’s pass booth with hostesses out there greeting everyone – or maybe a ski ramp display that ski instructors could use for demonstrations.

Anne Lanskail – Waitress – Emerald Estates

I think this year it will be better organized since they can learn from their experiences last year.

With the weather being as bad as it has been, they should plan some activities indoors or people may not take a chance on driving up.

Maybe they should plan a few more activities for the little kids. Last year there was lots for the big kids to do – especially in the beer gardens – but not so much for the little ones.

Mark Clarke – Trucker – Pemberton

There was nothing missing. If they can do everything they did last year – including pulling off the good weather – I think they’ll be doing really well.

There was just about everything last year – balloons for kids, rides on the hot air balloon, the Alpini Band, and the beer gardens (which had to be the highlight). I can’t think of much more you could add to that.

Whistler’s Answers: August 12, 1982

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1982.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: In August 1982, labour disputes between seventeen affiliated trade unions and the Construction Labour Relations Association shut down work on two sites in Whistler: the Keg building and the Carleton Lodge. BCGEU workers at the liquor store also went on strike for three days.

Question: Do you think the BCGEU strike and construction workers’ strike are warranted?

Max Maxwell – Truck Driver – Whistler Cay

No. The economic situation is such that you have to be prepared to take a little less.

The BCGEU strike helped destroy one of the few sources of income we have left in this province – tourism.

As for the construction workers, to ask for an exorbitant increase in wages like they are is sheer lunacy.

Diane Degusseme – Liquor Store Clerk – Brio Estates

The BCGEU strike is. We just finished a three-year contract and the economy has changed drastically in that time. It’s just what our slogan says, “Catch up and keep up.”

What we’re asking for is a 15 percent increase over one year – which works out to about $1 more per hour.

The construction workers though, as asking far too much in terms of today’s economy. The increase they want is more than some people make.

Basically, the whole province suffers from a bad case of union-itis.

Len Ritchie – Janitorial Service – Alpine Meadows

The construction workers are asking for a large increase, but I don’t think that’s their bottom line. It’s hard to say whether or not it’s warranted because we don’t know what they’ll settle for.

But as a person who has just renegotiated a mortgage (at a 25 percent increase), I’d have to say the government’s 6.5 percent wage restriction is way out of line.

Whistler’s Answers: August 5, 1982

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1982.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: Talk of allowing gambling in Whistler was not new in the 1980s, but an economic downturn made the idea of casinos more attractive to some residents, who argued it would bring more revenue and stable year-round employment. In 1982, a group called the Concerned Citizens for Whistler was formed in support of bringing gambling to Whistler. However, their views were not shared by all Whistler residents and, at a meeting held in August 1982, it was decided that community members did not have enough information and that a study should be done on the subject. Some concerns discussed at the meeting included the social impact of gambling, the possible altered character of Whistler, and a loss of autonomy as the industry would be strictly controlled by the province.

Question: Did the meeting tonight change your mind about legalizing gambling at Whistler?

Editor’s Note: The following three people were interviewed immediately following the August 1st meeting conducted by Concerned Citizens For Whistler on legalized gambling.

Dave Kirk – Alta Vista

This is a sit-on-the-fence answer, but what did the meeting accomplish? It really didn’t give us any facts on which to base a decision.

But the fact that there was a meeting indicates there is definitely an interest shown – especially for more information.

Jenny Busdon – Housewife – Whistler Cay

I came to the meeting not knowing if I was for or against it. There’s lots of pros and cons – I still don’t have an opinion.

I think our first priority is establishing Whistler as a first-class destination resort and putting our energies into promoting what we presently have here.

When this is done, maybe a concept of this kind would be more viable a few years down the road.

Larry Gunn – Whistler Courier – Alpine Meadows

It didn’t really change my opinion, which is that I think there needs to be more research done before the matter is put before the community and Council to make a decision.

Personally, I’m in favour of legalized gambling, but with qualifications. I’m not in favour of it just anywhere, though.

I’d like to see it kept in a very small segment before it spreads and gets out of hand.

Editor’s Note: These three individuals responded to the question “Do you think gambling should be legalized in Whistler?” in the Nov. 26, 1981 issue of the Whistler Question. It is interesting to note that the responses at that time were much more direct. All six people answered with a definite “yes” or “no” – with four in favour and two against the idea.

Ralph Kowin – Emerald Estates

Yes. Every week thousands of people in BC head for Nevada to gamble, and the money they spend would be better kept in BC. It would create more jobs for Whistler on a year-round basis and help stabilize the highs and lows in the economy. The larger tax base from hotels and casinos would help relieve the burden from property owners.

Wayne Weis – Alpine Meadows

Personally, I have nothing against gambling, but I don’t think they should legalize it here. I don’t think the community as a whole would accept it and I don’t think we have the facilities here to warrant something like gambling.

Don Beverley – Alpine Meadows

Yes, it’s a good idea. Whistler’s trying to become a world-class destination resort and in order to compete with other resorts we have to have the facilities to attract the sophisti-world traveller. Besides skiing in the winter, and windsurfing in the summer, we need something that happens continuously all year round that will attract people.

Whistler’s Answers: July 29, 1982

In the 1980s the Whistler Question began posing a question to three to six people and publishing their responses under “Whistler’s Answers” (not to be confused with the Whistler Answer).  Each week, we’ll be sharing one question and the answers given back in 1982.  Please note, all names/answers/occupations/neighbourhoods represent information given to the Question at the time of publishing and do not necessarily reflect the person today.

Some context for this week’s question: In July 1982, various publications, including The Vancouver Sun, published pieces on Whistler and the Whistler Village Land Company (WVLC). Some of the articles published implied that the WVLC had shut down and that Whistler, as a whole, was closed. In January 1983, the provincial government did step in and form a Crown corporation, Whistler Land Co. Developments, to take over the liabilities and assets of the WVLC, but as of July 1982 the WVLC was still operating.

Question: What was your reaction to media coverage outside of Whistler during last week’s events?

Sue Sherin – Assistant Manager at Whistler Tops – Alpine Meadows

Basically I thought the treatment the press gave to Whistler was pretty sad.

Because of the entire economic situation, what’s happened here is no different than anywhere else. But the coverage we’ve had – it makes people not want to come.

It’s beautiful here. And it’s been built in only two years. What does the press expect? They should give us more of a chance.

Mayor Pat Carleton – Westside Road

I think it’s been a disgraceful form of reporting. It just goes to show you that what you say is not necessarily what is printed.

All the media outside of Whistler – and I don’t name anyone specifically – has twisted the whole thing out of context. Nothing has been made clear.

The coverage has blown the negative aspect way out of proportion. I’ve even had a call from Lorne Greenaway in Ottawa (Whistler’s MP). He thinks the whole town has been shut down.

Alex Kleinman – Construction Manager – Alta Vista

I was disappointed in the bias taken by the media. I was hoping to see a little more of both sides of the story.

There are a lot of things which are still happening here – as well as things that aren’t.

Rather than ask municipal and Land Company officials on the history and evolution of the whole project here at Whistler, they have taken comments out of context and made that the story.